Repulsive guidance molecule A (RGM A) and its receptor neogenin during neural and neural crest cell development of Xenopus laevis

Authors

  • Susanne Gessert,

    1. Institute for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Ulm University, Albert-Einstein-Allee 11, D-89081 Ulm, Germany
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  • Daniel Maurus,

    1. Institute for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Ulm University, Albert-Einstein-Allee 11, D-89081 Ulm, Germany
    2. Department of Physiology, Development and Neurosciences, University of Cambridge, Downing Street, Cambridge CB2 3DY, U.K.
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  • Michael Kühl

    Corresponding author
    1. Institute for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Ulm University, Albert-Einstein-Allee 11, D-89081 Ulm, Germany
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To whom correspondence should be addressed (email michael.kuehl@uni-ulm.de).

Abstract

Background information. RGM A (repulsive guidance molecule A) is a GPI (glycosylphosphatidylinositol)-anchored glycoprotein which has repulsive properties on axons due to the interaction with its receptor neogenin. In addition, RGM A has been demonstrated to function as a BMP (bone morphogenetic protein) co-receptor.

Results. In the present study, we provide the first analysis of early RGM A and neogenin expression and function in Xenopus laevis neural development. Tissue-specific RGM A expression starts at stage 12.5 in the anterior neural plate. Loss-of-function analyses suggest a function of RGM A and neogenin in regulating anterior neural marker genes, as well as eye development and neural crest cell migration. Furthermore, overexpression of RGM A leads to ectopic expression of neural crest cell marker genes.

Conclusions. These data indicate that RGM A and neogenin have important functions during early neural development, in addition to their role during axonal guidance and synapse formation.

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