Suppression of the PI3K—Akt pathway is involved in the decreased adhesion and migration of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells from non-obese diabetic mice

Authors


Liren Li and Yunfei Xia contributed equally to this work.

To whom correspondence should be addressed (email sangam@ntu.edu.cn).

Abstract

T1DM (type 1 diabetes mellitus) is an autoimmune disease characterized by T-cell-mediated damage of islet β-cells. The pathology of NOD (non-obese diabetic) mouse involves the insulitis induced by infiltration of T-cells, a similar pathogenic mechanism in T1DM patient. BM-MSCs (bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells) are multipotent progenitor cells that can be isolated from a number of sources. Recent studies have shown that transplantation of MSCs to the NOD mice could prevent the process and have the therapeutic effects on T1DM. In our studies, we have found that migration and adhesion of BM-MSCs from NOD mice were suppressed compared with the BM-MSCs from ICR (imprinting control region) mice, accompanying with the abnormal distribution of FAK (focal adhesion kinase) and F-actin (filamentous actin). Further, we have found that the activation of PI3K (phosphoinositide 3-kinase)–Akt pathway was suppressed in BM-MSCs from NOD mice. When the PI3K—Akt pathway was inhibited by LY294002, the adhesion and migration of BM-MSCs from ICR mice were suppressed as well. These results indicated that the suppression of PI3K—Akt pathway is involved in the decreased adhesion and migration of BM-MSCs from NOD mice.

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