Liver regeneration after major hepatectomy for biliary cancer

Authors

  • Dr M. Nagino,

    Corresponding author
    1. First Department of Surgery, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, 65 Tsurumai-cho, Showa-ku, Nagoya 466–8550, Japan
    • First Department of Surgery, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, 65 Tsurumai-cho, Showa-ku, Nagoya 466–8550, Japan
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  • M. Ando,

    1. Department of Preventive Medicine, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, 65 Tsurumai-cho, Showa-ku, Nagoya 466–8550, Japan
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  • J. Kamiya,

    1. First Department of Surgery, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, 65 Tsurumai-cho, Showa-ku, Nagoya 466–8550, Japan
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  • K. Uesaka,

    1. First Department of Surgery, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, 65 Tsurumai-cho, Showa-ku, Nagoya 466–8550, Japan
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  • T. Sano,

    1. First Department of Surgery, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, 65 Tsurumai-cho, Showa-ku, Nagoya 466–8550, Japan
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  • Y. Nimura

    1. First Department of Surgery, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, 65 Tsurumai-cho, Showa-ku, Nagoya 466–8550, Japan
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Abstract

Background:

The aim of this study was to evaluate serial changes in liver volume after major hepatectomy for biliary cancer and to elucidate clinical factors influencing liver regeneration.

Methods:  

Serial changes in liver volume were determined, using computed tomography, in 81 patients with biliary cancer who underwent right hepatic lobectomy or more extensive liver resection with or without portal vein resection and/or pancreatoduodenectomy. Possible factors influencing liver regeneration were evaluated by univariate and multivariate analyses.

Results:

The remnant mean(s.d.) liver volume was 41(8) per cent straight after hepatectomy. This increased rapidly to 59(9) per cent within 2 weeks, then increased more slowly, finally reaching a plateau at 74(12) per cent about 1 year after hepatectomy. The regeneration rate within the first 2 weeks was 16(8) cm3/day and was not related to the extent of posthepatectomy liver dysfunction. On multivariate analysis, the extent of liver resection (P < 0·001), body surface area (P = 0·02), combined portal vein resection (P = 0·024) and preoperative portal vein embolization (P = 0·047) were significantly associated with the liver regeneration rate within the first 2 weeks. In addition, body surface area (P < 0·001) and liver function expressed as plasma clearance rate of indocyanine green (P = 0·01) were significant determinants of final liver volume 1 year after hepatectomy.

Conclusion:

The liver regenerates rapidly in the first 2 weeks after major hepatectomy for biliary cancer. This early regeneration is influenced by four clinical factors. Thereafter, liver regeneration progresses slowly and stops when the liver is three-quarters of its original volume, approximately 6 months to 1 year after hepatectomy. © 2001 British Journal of Surgery Society Ltd

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