Migrating neurons cross a reelin-rich territory to form an organized tissue out of embryonic cortical slices

Authors

  • Cecilia Hedin-Pereira,

    1. Programa de Neurobiologia, Instituto de Biofísica Carlos Chagas Filho, UFRJ, Centro de Ciências da Saúde, Bl. G, Cidade Universitária, 21949–900, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
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  • Elizabeth C. P. DeMoraes,

    1. Departamento de Anatomia, Instituto de Ciências Biomédicas, UFRJ, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
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  • Marcelo F. Santiago,

    1. Programa de Neurobiologia, Instituto de Biofísica Carlos Chagas Filho, UFRJ, Centro de Ciências da Saúde, Bl. G, Cidade Universitária, 21949–900, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
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  • Rosalia Méndez-Otero,

    1. Programa de Neurobiologia, Instituto de Biofísica Carlos Chagas Filho, UFRJ, Centro de Ciências da Saúde, Bl. G, Cidade Universitária, 21949–900, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
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  • Roberto Lent

    1. Departamento de Anatomia, Instituto de Ciências Biomédicas, UFRJ, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
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: Dr Cecilia Hedin-Pereira, as above.
E-mail: hedin@biof.ufrj.br

Abstract

In this study we show that the radial migration of neuronal precursors out of cerebral cortex of embryonic brain slices cultured for 4–7 days gives rise to an organized tissue that forms de novo off developing slices. In our in vitro preparations, migrating neuronal precursors overshot the marginal zone, as did the elongation of radial glial processes out of the slices. These cells detached from radial glia at a distance from the cortex and differentiated into pyramidal and nonpyramidal profiles that expressed different neuronal markers. Glial precursors were shown to proliferate in the slice and in the neotissue, and to differentiate into astrocytes. We show that cells expressing reelin in the marginal zone of embryonic cortical slices persist after a week in culture, which implies that neuronal migration is not necessarily hindered by the presumed stop signals provided by reelin in the marginal zone. Furthermore, our results provide a new model for in vitro studies of migration and differentiation during cortical development.

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