Professionally indicated short-term risk-taking in the treatment of borderline personality disorder

Authors

  • Roy Krawitz,

    Corresponding author
      Dr Roy Krawitz, Mental Health Administration, Health Waikato, PO Box 934, Hamilton, New Zealand.Email: roykrawitz@xtra.co.nz
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  • Wendy Jackson,

  • Ruth Allen,

  • Ann Connell,

  • Nick Argyle,

  • Clive Bensemann,

  • Cris Mileshkin


  • Roy Krawitz

    Consultant Psychiatrist/Psychotherapist, Health Waikato, Hamilton, New Zealand.

    Wendy Jackson

    Freelance Consumer Consultant and Registered Nurse, Auckland, New Zealand.

    Ruth Allen

    Registered Clinical Psychologist, Balance Programme, Auckland District Health Board, Auckland, New Zealand.

    Ann Connell

    Consultant Clinical Psychologist and Team Leader, Wellington Regional Personality Disorder Service, Capital Coast Health Mental Health Services, Wellington, New Zealand.

    Nick Argyle

    Clinical Director and Consultant Psychiatrist, Mental Health Services, Auckland District Health Board, Auckland and Honorary Senior Lecturer, Department of Psychiatry, Auckland School of Medicine, Auckland University, Auckland, New Zealand.

    Clive Bensemann

    Clinical Services Director and Consultant Psychiatrist, Mental Health Services, Health Waikato, Hamilton, New Zealand.

    Cris Mileshkin

    Director of Clinical Services and Consultant Psychiatrist, St Vincent's Mental Health Service, Melbourne, Vic., Australia.

Dr Roy Krawitz, Mental Health Administration, Health Waikato, PO Box 934, Hamilton, New Zealand.Email: roykrawitz@xtra.co.nz

Abstract

Objective: To define and explore the rationale for professionally indicated short-term risk-taking in treating adults with borderline personality disorder, and discuss prerequisites for the approach, clinical implementation and medicolegal contexts.

Conclusion: When prerequisites are met and clinical and medicolegal practice is sound and thorough, taking short-term risk, as part of a comprehensive treatment, is a legitimate professional consideration in working with some adults with borderline personality disorder.

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