Get access

Evolution and determinants of host specificity in the genus Lamellodiscus (Monogenea)

Authors

  • YVES DESDEVISES,

    Corresponding author
    1. Centre de Biologie et d’Écologie Tropicale et Méditerranéenne, UMR CNRS 5555, Université de Perpignan, 52 Avenue de Villeneuve, F-66860 Perpignan Cedex, France
    2. Département de Sciences Biologiques, Université de Montréal, C.P. 6128, succursale Centre-ville, Montréal (Québec) H3C 3J7, Canada
    Search for more papers by this author
  • SERGE MORAND,

    1. Centre de Biologie et d’Écologie Tropicale et Méditerranéenne, UMR CNRS 5555, Université de Perpignan, 52 Avenue de Villeneuve, F-66860 Perpignan Cedex, France
    Search for more papers by this author
  • PIERRE LEGENDRE

    1. Département de Sciences Biologiques, Université de Montréal, C.P. 6128, succursale Centre-ville, Montréal (Québec) H3C 3J7, Canada
    Search for more papers by this author

Corresponding author. Present address: Laboratoire Arago, Université Pierre et Marie Curie, UMR CNRS 7628, BP 44, 66651 Banyuls-sur-Mer Cedex, France. E-mail: desdevises@obs-banyuls.fr

Abstract

The evolution and determinants of host specificity in Lamellodiscus species (Monogenea, Diplectanidae) were investigated. The 20 known Mediterranean species were studied, all parasites of fishes from the family Sparidae (Teleostei). An index of specificity, which takes into account the phylogenetic relationships of their fish host species, was defined. The link between specificity and its potential determinants was investigated in a phylogenetic context using the method of independent contrasts. Host specificity in Lamellodiscus species appeared to be highly constrained by phylogeny, but also linked to host size. Mapping specificity onto the parasite phylogenetic tree suggests that specialist species do not represent an evolutionary dead end, and that specialization is not a derived condition. It is hypothesized that the ability to be generalist or specialist in Lamellodiscus is controlled by intrinsic, phylogenetically-related characteristics, and that specialist species tend to use large hosts, which may be more predictable. © 2002 The Linnean Society of London, Biological Journal of the Linnean Society , 2002, 77, 431−443.

Ancillary