Get access

Pregnancy following renal transplantation

Authors

  • John M. Davison,

    Corresponding author
    1. Directorate of Women's Services, and Department of Obstetrics & Gynaecology, Royal Victoria Infirmary, University of Newcastle upon Tyne, Newcastle upon Tyne, UK
    Search for more papers by this author
  • David J. Bailey

    1. Directorate of Women's Services, and Department of Obstetrics & Gynaecology, Royal Victoria Infirmary, University of Newcastle upon Tyne, Newcastle upon Tyne, UK
    Search for more papers by this author

Reprint request to: Professor J.M. Davison, Department of Obstetrics & Gynaecology, 4th Floor, Leazes Wing, Royal Victoria Infirmary, Newcastle upon Tyne NE1 4LP UK. Email: j.m.davison@ncl.ac.uk

Abstract

Pregnancy is not contraindicated in renal transplant recipients with stable renal function, and a successful and healthy obstetric outcome can be expected in 95% of such cases. The incidence of both maternal and fetal complications is related to the degree of graft dysfunction and/or hypertension prior to pregnancy. Poorer prognosis is associated with poorer renal function. If complications (usually hypertension, renal deterioration, and/or rejection) occur before 28 weeks, then successful obstetric outcome is reduced by 20%. More information is needed about the intrauterine effects and neonatal consequences of maternal immunosuppression, which appears harmless at maintenance levels. From the data available it seems that pregnancy does not compromise long-term transplant prognosis. In the absence of prospective controlled studies transplant pregnancy registries are the only viable means of providing clinicians with timely and relevant information on pregnancy outcomes on which to base management guidelines.

Ancillary