Trends in clinical management of women with von Willebrand disease: a survey of 75 women enrolled in haemophilia treatment centres in the United States

Authors

  • A Kirtava,

    1. Division of AIDS, STD, and Laboratory Research, National Center for Infectious Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, US Department of Health and Human Services, Atlanta, GA, USA
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  • S Crudder,

    1. Division of AIDS, STD, and Laboratory Research, National Center for Infectious Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, US Department of Health and Human Services, Atlanta, GA, USA
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  • A Dilley,

    1. Division of AIDS, STD, and Laboratory Research, National Center for Infectious Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, US Department of Health and Human Services, Atlanta, GA, USA
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  • C Lally,

    1. Division of AIDS, STD, and Laboratory Research, National Center for Infectious Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, US Department of Health and Human Services, Atlanta, GA, USA
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  • B Evatt

    1. Division of AIDS, STD, and Laboratory Research, National Center for Infectious Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, US Department of Health and Human Services, Atlanta, GA, USA
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Anna Kirtava, MD, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road, Mail Stop E-64, Atlanta, GA 30333, USA.
Tel.: 404-371-5257; fax: 404-371-5424;
e-mail: akirtava@cdc.gov

Abstract

Summary.  Objective:  To assess the management of women with von Willebrand disease( vWD) in an Heamophilia Treatment Center (HTC) setting.

Methods:  A total of 75 women with vWd who were registered in HTCs in the United States participated in this study. A telephone interview elicited information about symptoms pertaining to bleeding disorders, diagnostic issues, referral patterns, treatment modalities before and after the enrollment in the HTC, HTC services provided, and satisfaction with care in the HTC.

Results:  Menorrhagia was the most commonly reported symptom (84%). The average time from the first symptom until clinician recognition was 16 years (range 0-39). In HTC, DDAVP was the most commonly used drug (31%). Of the 75 women, 71 reported a strong positive opinion and satisfaction about their care in the HTCs.

Discussion:  Women with VWD were typically diagnosed with the condition well into adulthood, in spite of the fact that majority of them experienced several bleeding symptoms beginning in early childhood. In general an HTC setting is appropriate for management of women with bleeding disorders. Diagnosis, treatment and education provided in the HTCs were viewed positively by those surveyed.

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