Hydrophobins and the interactions between fungi and plants

Authors

  • James R. Whiteford,

    1. Department of Biological Sciences, Imperial College of Science, Technology and Medicine, Sir Alexander Fleming Building, Imperial College Road, London, UK
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  • Pietro D. Spanu

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Biological Sciences, Imperial College of Science, Technology and Medicine, Sir Alexander Fleming Building, Imperial College Road, London, UK
      * Correspondence: Department of Biological Sciences, Imperial College of Science Technology and Medicine, Sir Alexander Fleming Building, Imperial College Road, London SW7 2AZ, UK. Tel.: +44 207 594 5384; Fax: +44 207 584 2056 E-mail: p.spanu@ic.ac.uk and j.whiteford@ic.ac.uk
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* Correspondence: Department of Biological Sciences, Imperial College of Science Technology and Medicine, Sir Alexander Fleming Building, Imperial College Road, London SW7 2AZ, UK. Tel.: +44 207 594 5384; Fax: +44 207 584 2056 E-mail: p.spanu@ic.ac.uk and j.whiteford@ic.ac.uk

Summary

Hydrophobins are small proteins thought to be ubiquitous in filamentous fungi. They are usually secreted and are found on the outer surfaces of cell walls of hyphae and conidia where they mediate interactions between the fungus and the environment. We review here what is currently known about the primary and secondary structure of these proteins, as well as their post-translational modifications. We also discuss the diverse functions of hydrophobins in biology and development, with particular attention to fungi involved in pathogenesis and symbiosis.

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