SEARCH

SEARCH BY CITATION

Aim:

To compare the efficacy and tolerability of olsalazine sodium with enteric-coated mesalazine in inducing endoscopic remission in patients with mild to moderate active ulcerative colitis.

Patients and methods:

Patients with mild to moderate active ulcerative colitis were randomized to receive either olsalazine sodium, 3 g/day (n = 88), or mesalazine, 3 g/day (n = 80), for up to 12 weeks.

Results:

Of the patients treated with olsalazine sodium, 52.2% achieved endoscopic remission, compared with 48.8% of patients treated with mesalazine. This difference was not significant (= 0.67). There was a non-significant trend for patients with left-sided colitis or a more severe endoscopic grade to achieve remission if they were treated with olsalazine sodium than if they were treated with mesalazine. Both treatments were comparable with respect to clinical activity index and an investigator’s global assessment. Seventy patients reported one or more adverse events; adverse events were seen in 45% of olsalazine sodium-treated patients and in 36% of mesalazine-treated patients. Eleven patients treated with olsalazine sodium and nine patients treated with mesalazine withdrew from the study because of adverse events. One patient treated with olsalazine sodium compared with two treated with mesalazine stopped treatment because of diarrhoea. Serious adverse events occurred in three patients treated with olsalazine sodium and in four treated with mesalazine.

Conclusion:

Therapeutic effectiveness and tolerance to the treatment did not differ between olsalazine sodium, 3 g/day, and mesalazine, 3 g/day, in inducing endoscopic remission in patients with mild to moderate active ulcerative colitis within 12 weeks of treatment.