Genetic polymorphisms of CYP2C9 and CYP2C19 in the Beninese and Belgian populations

Authors

  • Aurel C. Allabi,

    1. Medical Faculty of National University of Benin (UNB),
    2. Applied Molecular Technologies, Centre for Human Genetics, Université Catholique de Louvain (UCL), Louvain, Belgium,
    3. Clinical Pharmacology Unit, St Luc University Hospital (UCL), Brussels, Belgium, and
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  • Jean-Luc Gala,

    Corresponding author
    1. Applied Molecular Technologies, Centre for Human Genetics, Université Catholique de Louvain (UCL), Louvain, Belgium,
    2. Defence Laboratories Department (DG MR), Belgian Armed Forces, Brussels, Belgium
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  • Jean-Pierre Desager,

    1. Clinical Pharmacology Unit, St Luc University Hospital (UCL), Brussels, Belgium, and
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  • Michel Heusterspreute,

    1. Applied Molecular Technologies, Centre for Human Genetics, Université Catholique de Louvain (UCL), Louvain, Belgium,
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  • Yves Horsmans

    1. Clinical Pharmacology Unit, St Luc University Hospital (UCL), Brussels, Belgium, and
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J.-L. Gala MD, PhD, Laboratory of Applied Molecular Technology, Centre for Human Genetics–UCL, Clos Chapelle-aux-Champs, 30-UCL/30.46, B-1200, Brussels, Belgium. Tel.: + 32 2 764 3165; Fax: + 32 2 764 3166; E-mail: gala@lbcm.ucl.ac.be

Abstract

Aims  To investigate the distribution of cytochrome P450 2C9 (CYP2C9) and 2C19 (CYP2C19) genotype frequencies in the Beninese and Belgian Caucasian populations.

Methods  Beninese (n = 111) and Belgian (n = 121) were genotyped for CYP2C9*2, *3, *4, *5, and *11 as well as for CYP2C19*2 and*3.

Results  The distribution of alleles was: CYP2C9*1: 95.5 vs. 82.2% (P < 0.001); CYP2C9*2: 0 vs. 10% (P < 0.001); CYP2C9*3: 0 vs. 7.4% (P < 0.01); CYP2C9*4: both 0%; CYP2C9*5: 1.8 vs. 0% (P = 0.05); and CYP2C9*11: 2.7 vs. 0.4% (P < 0.05). The frequencies of the CYP2C19*2 allele were 13 vs. 9.1%, respectively. CYP2C19*3 was not detected in either population. The 95% confidence intervals for the differences of frequencies of CYP2C9*1, CYP2C9*2, CYP2C9*3, CYP2C9*4, CYP2C9*5, CYP2C9*11, CYP2C19*1, CYP2C19*2 and CYP2C19*3 between  Belgian  and  Beninese  were  7%,  19%;  − 14%,  − 6%;  − 11%, − 4%; − 1%, 1%; 0%, 4%; 0%, 5%; − 10%, 2%; − 2%, 10%; − 1%; respectively. The distributions of CYP2C9 genotypes in the Beninese and Belgian individuals were: CYP2C9*1/*1: 91 vs. 67% (P < 0.00001); CYP2C9*1/*2: 0 vs. 18.2% (P < 0.0001); CYP2C9*1/*3: 0 vs. 11.6% (P < 0.001); CYP2C9*1/*5: 3.6 vs. 0% (P = 0.05); CYP2C9*1/*11: 5.4 vs. 0.8% (P = 0.05); CYP2C9*2/*3: 0 vs. 1.6% (NS); CYP2C9*3/*3: 0 vs. 0.8% (NS). The distributions of CYP2C19 genotypes between these ethnic groups were: CYP2C19*1/*1: 73.9 vs. 83.5% (NS); CYP2C19*1/*2: 26.1 vs. 14.9% (P < 0.05); CYP2C9*2/*2: 0 vs. 1.6% (NS).

Conclusions  Differences of allele frequencies between Beninese and Belgian populations were statistically significant for CYP2C9*2, *3, *5 and *11, but not for CYP2C9*4 or for CYP2C19*2 and *3.

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