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Effect of house dust mite avoidance measures in children with atopic dermatitis

Authors

  • G. Ricci,

    1. Departments of Paediatrics and Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Dermatology, University of Bologna,
      Via Massarenti 11, 40138 Bologna, Italy
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  • A. Patrizi,

    1. Departments of Paediatrics and Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Dermatology, University of Bologna,
      Via Massarenti 11, 40138 Bologna, Italy
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  • F. Specchia,

    1. Departments of Paediatrics and Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Dermatology, University of Bologna,
      Via Massarenti 11, 40138 Bologna, Italy
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  • L. Menna,

    1. Departments of Paediatrics and Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Dermatology, University of Bologna,
      Via Massarenti 11, 40138 Bologna, Italy
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  • P. Bottau,

    1. Departments of Paediatrics and Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Dermatology, University of Bologna,
      Via Massarenti 11, 40138 Bologna, Italy
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  • V. D’Angelo,

    1. Departments of Paediatrics and Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Dermatology, University of Bologna,
      Via Massarenti 11, 40138 Bologna, Italy
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  • M. Masi

    1. Departments of Paediatrics and Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Dermatology, University of Bologna,
      Via Massarenti 11, 40138 Bologna, Italy
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Dr Giampaolo Ricci. E-mail: ricci@med.unibo.it

Abstract

Background House dust mite allergens are associated with atopic dermatitis (AD).  Objectives The aim of our study was to verify if house dust mite allergen avoidance measures can improve the clinical manifestations of AD in children.  Methods Forty-one children (mean age 3·9 years) affected by AD associated with high total and/or specific IgE serum levels (‘extrinsic’ AD) were recruited. Clinical evaluation was performed utilizing the Severity Scoring of AD (SCORAD) index; dust was sampled from the children’s beds and tested using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The study was planned in two parts. In the first part, a placebo-controlled trial of 2 months duration, mite allergen avoidance measures (encasing mattresses and pillows; a weekly hot wash of bedding; frequent vacuum cleaning of living room and bedroom; soft toys and carpets regularly cleaned or removed; no pets allowed) were recommended to group A patients, but not to group B. In the second part of the study, environmental avoidance measures were recommended to initial control group B patients also. One year after the start of the study the amounts of mite allergen in the home and clinical score of AD were measured in both groups.  Results At the end of the first part of the study, significant decreases in major allergens of Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus (Der p1) and D. farinae (Der f1) load (from 393 to 94 ng m−2) and concentration (from 1·84 to 0·73 µg g−1 of dust) in children’s beds were observed in treatment group A. At the same time, in this group the mean SCORAD index improved significantly (from 33 to 26; P = 0·022). After 12 months, when all patients had used allergen avoidance measures, Der p1 + Der f1 load, concentration and clinical score had improved, reaching similar values in both groups.  Conclusions Simple mite allergen avoidance measures should be recommended to families with children affected by extrinsic AD in order to control the clinical manifestations and prevent mite sensitization.

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