Anti-prothrombin antibodies combined with lupus anti-coagulant activity is an essential risk factor for venous thromboembolism in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus

Authors


Junzo Nojima, Central Laboratory for Clinical Investigation, Osaka University Hospital, 2–15 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871, Japan. E-mail: nojima@hp-lab.med.osaka-u.ac.jp

Abstract

Anti-prothrombin antibodies (anti-prothrombin) and anti-β2-glycoprotein I antibodies (anti-β2-GP I) are the most common and characterized anti-phospholipid antibodies (aPL) detected using specific enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) systems. Recently, lupus anti-coagulant (LA) activity detected by a phospholipid-dependent coagulation assay was reported to be associated with anti-prothrombin and/or anti–β2-GP I. Here we show that the co-existence of IgG anti-prothrombin and LA activity might be an essential risk factor for venous thromboembolism (VTE) in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). We examined not only the levels of antibodies to prothrombin and anti-β2-GP I (both IgG and IgM isotypes) using an ELISA system, but also LA activity detected using both diluted Russell's viper venom time (dRVVT) and STACLOT LA test in 124 patients with SLE. The SLE patients were divided into four groups according to the results of ELISA and LA assay results for each aPL: group A, ELISA+ and LA+ group B, ELISA+ and LA; group C, ELISA and LA+ group D, ELISA and LA. Regarding IgG anti-prothrombin, the prevalence of VTE was significantly higher in group A (16/35 cases, 45·7%, P < 0·001, Fisher's exact probability test) than in the other groups (B, 2/30, 6·7%; C, 1/22, 4·5%; D, 1/37, 2·7%). With respect to IgM anti-prothrombin and IgG or IgM anti-β2-GP I, the prevalence of VTE was higher in both groups A and C than in group D, but no statistical difference in prevalence was found between groups A and C. Multivariate logistic regression analysis of risk factors for VTE confirmed that the co-existence of IgG anti-prothrombin and LA activity was the only significant risk factor for VTE (odds ratio, 19·13; 95% confidence intervals, 4·74–77·18).

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