Laparoscopy extends the indications for liver resection in patients with cirrhosis

Authors

  • M. Y. Abdel-Atty,

    1. Department of Hepato-biliary and Digestive Surgery, Beaujon Hospital, University Paris VII, Clichy, France
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  • Professor O. Farges,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Hepato-biliary and Digestive Surgery, Beaujon Hospital, University Paris VII, Clichy, France
    • Service de Chirurgie, Hôpital Beaujon, 100 Boulevard du Général Leclerc, 92 118 Clichy Cedex, France
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  • P. Jagot,

    1. Department of Hepato-biliary and Digestive Surgery, Beaujon Hospital, University Paris VII, Clichy, France
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  • J. Belghiti

    1. Department of Hepato-biliary and Digestive Surgery, Beaujon Hospital, University Paris VII, Clichy, France
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Abstract

Background:

Clinical or biological evidence of liver failure is usually considered a contraindication to open liver surgery as it is associated with a prohibitive risk of postoperative death.

Methods:

This report describes three patients who had resection of a superficial hepatocellular carcinoma suspected either to be ruptured, or at high risk of rupture, using the laparoscopic approach. All three patients had intractable ascites, in two superimposed on active hepatitis. Surgery was per- formed under continuous carbon dioxide pneumoperitoneum with intermittent clamping of the hepatic pedicle.

Results:

Intraoperative blood loss was between 100 and 400 ml; no blood transfusion was required. The postoperative course was uneventful except for a transient leak of ascites through the trocar wounds. Duration of in-hospital stay was 6–10 days. Liver function tests had returned to preoperative values within 1 month of surgery in all patients.

Conclusion:

The laparoscopic approach may enable liver resection in patients with cirrhosis and evidence of liver failure that would contraindicate open surgery. © 1999 British Journal of Surgery Society Ltd

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