Neutrophils enhance eosinophil migration across monolayers of lung epithelial cells

Authors

  • A. E. M. Zuurbier,

    1. Central Laboratory of the Netherlands Blood Transfusion Service and Laboratory of Experimental and Clinical Immunology, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands
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  • L. Liu,

    1. Central Laboratory of the Netherlands Blood Transfusion Service and Laboratory of Experimental and Clinical Immunology, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands
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  • F. P. J. Mul,

    1. Central Laboratory of the Netherlands Blood Transfusion Service and Laboratory of Experimental and Clinical Immunology, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands
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  • A. J. Verhoeven,

    1. Central Laboratory of the Netherlands Blood Transfusion Service and Laboratory of Experimental and Clinical Immunology, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands
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  • E. F. Knol,

    1. Central Laboratory of the Netherlands Blood Transfusion Service and Laboratory of Experimental and Clinical Immunology, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands
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  • D. Roos

    1. Central Laboratory of the Netherlands Blood Transfusion Service and Laboratory of Experimental and Clinical Immunology, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands
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Dirk Roos, Central Laboratory of the Netherlands Blood Transfusion Service, Plesmanlaan 125, 1066 CX Amsterdam, The Netherlands. E-mail: D_Roos@CLB.NL

Abstract

During the late-phase asthmatic response eosinophils and neutrophils infiltrate the lungs and cause severe damage. In this study, we investigated in vitro the migration of eosinophils, in the absence and presence of neutrophils, across a monolayer of lung H292 epithelial cells. The migration of eosinophils towards the complement fragment 5a (C5a) was increased when neutrophils were added to the upper compartment of the Transwells, and decreased when neutrophils were added to the lower compartment. Moreover, neutrophils exclusively stimulated eosinophil migration towards C5a, and not towards other chemoattractants such as RANTES, IL-8 or PAF. Neutrophils and eosinophils differed in that neutrophils, but not eosinophils, rapidly inactivated C5a, suggesting that neutrophils in the upper compartment remove part of the active C5a that has diffused into the upper compartment. Indeed, we found that the addition of other C5a-degrading agents, such as human serum or carboxypeptidase B, also enhanced eosinophil migration when added to the upper compartment and decreased migration when added to the lower compartment. Taken together, these results indicate that the presence of neutrophils influences the migratory behaviour of eosinophils in vitro. The neutrophils presumably maintain a proper C5a chemotactic gradient in the transmigration model, which results in enhanced eosinophil chemotaxis.

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