Cross-reactive antibodies between HIV-gp120 and platelet gpIIIa (CD61) in HIV-related immune thrombocytopenic purpura

Authors


Dr P. Bierling Centre de Transfusion, Hôpital Henri Mondor, 51 Avenue du Maréchal de Lattre de Tassigny, 94010, Créteil, France

Abstract

We have previously demonstrated that immune platelet destruction observed in an AIDS-free HIV-infected patient was associated with the presence of a cross-reactive antibody recognizing both HIV-glycoprotein (gp)120 and platelet gpIIIa (CD61). We have now investigated the presence of such antibodies in other HIV-infected patients, together with the molecular structure of the cross-reactive epitope. Platelet gpIIb/IIIa antibodies were characterized in sera from HIV-infected patients with immune thrombocytopenic purpura by means of an ELISA and a radioimmunoprecipitation procedure (RIP). The platelet antibodies were purified and tested for their ability to recognize HIV-gp. We also tried to characterize the antibody target epitope on HIV-gp120 using recombinant gp and synthetic peptides. IgG with anti-gpIIb/IIIa activity were detected, by means of an ELISA with purified gpIIb/IIIa, in 101/138 (73%) sera from HIV-infected patients with immune thrombocytopenic purpura. The platelet antibodies were purified from 23 sera by absorption/elution on purified immobilized platelet gpIIb/IIIa, and recognition of gpIIIa was confirmed in eight cases with a RIP. Furthermore, the presence of a cross-reactive antibody between HIV-gp120 and platelet gpIIIa was demonstrated in 18/18 patients (including the eight with a confirmed gpIIIa antibody) by the ability of the serum HIV-gp160/120 antibodies to bind to purified gpIIb/IIIa. The cross-reactive epitope was shown to be independent of the carbohydrate moieties of gp120, since deglycosylation of two recombinant (r)-gp120s did not abolish antibody binding. However, the antibody did not recognize synthetic gp120 peptides spanning 355 of the 516 amino acids of gp120, particularly the four regions exhibiting sequences of four or five consecutive amino acids that are identical between r-gp120 and gpIIIa. Our results thus support the hypothesis that the cross-reactive antibody recognizes the conformational structure of gp120. These results strongly suggest that molecular mimicry between HIV-gp120 and platelet gpIIIa may be important in the pathogenesis of immune thrombocytopenia in AIDS-free HIV-infected patients.

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