Deregulated cytokine network and defective Th1 immune response in multiple myeloma

Authors

  • M. A. Frassanito,

    1. Department of Biomedical Sciences and Human Oncology, Section of Internal Medicine and Clinical Oncology, University of Bari Medical School, Bari, Italy
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  • A. Cusmai,

    1. Department of Biomedical Sciences and Human Oncology, Section of Internal Medicine and Clinical Oncology, University of Bari Medical School, Bari, Italy
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  • F. Dammacco

    1. Department of Biomedical Sciences and Human Oncology, Section of Internal Medicine and Clinical Oncology, University of Bari Medical School, Bari, Italy
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Dr Franco Dammacco, DIMO-Section of Internal Medicine and Clinical Oncology, P.za G. Cesare, 11, 70124-Bari-Italy.  E-mail: dimoclin@cimedoc.uniba.it

Abstract

Intracellular cytokine production by peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) was analysed in 51 patients with multiple myeloma (MM), 22 with monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) and 20 healthy subjects, as a parameter of immunological dysfunction in MM. An increased proportion of T cells and HLA-DR+ cells producing IL-6 was observed in MM patients with active disease (at diagnosis and relapsing) compared with patients in remission and with MGUS, whereas no difference of IFN-γ+, IL-2+ PBMC between patients and controls was evident. Determination of serum cytokine levels demonstrated that the imbalanced IL-6 production by T cells and the defective anti-tumour Th1 cell activity were related to elevated levels of IL-6 and IL-12. In vitro studies of PHA- and anti-CD3/anti-CD28 MoAbs stimulation of PBMC demonstrated the ability of lymphocytes from MM patients to differentiate towards the Th1 subset in the presence of rIL-12. By contrast, addition of exogenous rIL-6 impaired IFN-γ production by rIL-12-prompted T cells. Inhibition of Th1 polarization of the immune response by IL-6 was direct on T cells and not mediated by dendritic cells (DC). Evaluation of the ability of MM-derived DC to stimulate cell proliferation of allogenic T lymphocytes and produce IL-12 in vitro, in fact, suggested that MM-derived DC were functionally active. Taken as a whole, these results indicate that a deregulated cytokine network occurs in active MM. They also suggest that increased IL-6 production by peripheral T lymphocytes contributes to the immune dysfunction observed in MM, and enables tumour cells to escape immune surveillance by preventing the anti-tumour Th1 immune response.

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