SEARCH

SEARCH BY CITATION

Since very few tools used in health education are carefully evaluated, the aim of this study was to examine the effect that a breastfeeding information booklet had on breastfeeding behaviour Feedback about breastfeeding information needs from a preliminary study of 58 Perth mothers at 3 months postpartum provided the basis for the development of an information booklet The sample consisted of 150 mothers of full-term infants who were breastfeeding for the first time Upon discharge from hospital, a random sample of 75 mothers were sent the booklet These mothers and a control group (n= 75) were surveyed for 52 weeks to compare breastfeeding duration Although the breastfeeding information booklet was found to be useful by 97% of the experimental group, there was no significant difference noted for breastfeeding duration between groups Study findings have implications for clinical practice in highlighting the importance of breastfeeding information in increasing mothers’ confidence, providing suggestions for breastfeeding practice, and helping mothers not to feel alone in their concerns Further research should include investigations into the association between mothers reaching their intended goal for breastfeeding duration and being satisfied with the breastfeeding experience Success with breastfeeding tends to be measured by duration alone, but no research to date has specifically examined the criteria mothers use to determine if their breastfeeding experience was successful