Pain: the views of elderly people living in long-term residential care settings

Authors

  • Patsy Yates MSocSci BA DipAppSc RN,

    Corresponding author
    1. Lecturer, School of Nursing, Queensland University of Technology, Red Hill, Queensland, Australia
      Patsy Yates, Lecturer, School of Nursing, Queensland University of Technology, Kelvin Grove Campus, Locked Bag No 2, Red Hill, Queensland 4059, Australia
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  • Belinda Fentunan MEd BAppSc DipAppSc RN RM,

    1. Lecturer, School of Nursing, Queensland University of Technology, Red Hill, Queensland, Australia
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  • Anne Dewar MHP BScN BA RN

    1. Lecturer, School of Nursing, Queensland University of Technology, Red Hill, Queensland, Australia
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Patsy Yates, Lecturer, School of Nursing, Queensland University of Technology, Kelvin Grove Campus, Locked Bag No 2, Red Hill, Queensland 4059, Australia

Abstract

While an individual's beliefs and attitudes have long been considered important factors in how people respond to pain, few studies have attempted to provide in-depth descriptions of the nature of such pain beliefs and attitudes The aim of this research was to investigate the views of pain and pain management practices held by elderly people living in long-term residential care settings Ten 60–90 minute focus group interviews, each involving around five elderly people, were conducted in four large, long-term residential care settings in Brisbane, Australia Categories of beliefs and attitudes regarding pain were identified following analysis of the verbatim transcripts of these interviews Findings suggest that many elderly people living in long-term residential care settings may have become resigned to pain, that they are ambivalent about the benefit of any action for their pain and that they may be reluctant to express their pain Implications of these beliefs and attitudes are discussed

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