Caring for a demented elderly person — burden and burnout among caregiving relatives

Authors

  • Britt Almberg,

    Corresponding author
    1. University Lecturer, Doctoral Student, Stockholm Gerontology Research Center and Department of Clinical Neuroscience and Family Medicine Division of Geriatric Medicine, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden
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  • Margareta Grafström RNT phD,

    1. Senior Lecturer, Stockholm Gerontology Research Center and Department of Clinical Neuroscience and Family Medicine Division of Geriatric Medicine, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden
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  • Bengt Winblad MD phD

    1. Professor, Stockholm Gerontology Research Center and Department of Clinical Neuroscience and Family Medicine Division of Geriatric Medicine, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden
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Britt Almberg, Stockholom Gerontology Research Center, Dalagatan 9–11, S-11382 Stockholm Sweden.

Abstract

Fifty-two family caregivers for demented elderly people were investigated for burden and burnout experiences. A structured burden questionnaire and the Burnout Measure were used. Burnout is described in relation to the caregiver's gender, age, family relationship and the demented person's living place. Older wives and daughters-in-law also risked developing burnout. Regression analysis showed that limitation in social life, poor health and a lack of positive outlook on caring were the most important independent variables explaining variance in burnout among caregivers having their demented elderly person living at home and those having them in an institution.

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