Factors affecting the decision of nursing students in Taiwan to be vaccinated against Hepatitis B infection

Authors

  • Wen-Chuan Lin MSc RN,

    1. Assistant Teacher, National Taipei College of Nursing, Taiwan
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  • Carol Ball MSc RGN

    Corresponding author
    1. Course Director — MSc in Nursing, City University, London, England
      Carol Ball, St Bartholomew's School of Nursing, City University, 20 Bartholomew Close, West Smithfield, London EC1A 7QN, England.
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Carol Ball, St Bartholomew's School of Nursing, City University, 20 Bartholomew Close, West Smithfield, London EC1A 7QN, England.

Abstract

Compliance with Hepatitis B vaccination for nurses has been reported to be low in Taiwan. Therefore, a study of nursing students’ views was conducted in Taiwan to discover possible reasons. As complex decision-making was involved in taking the vaccine, a four-level utility decision model underpinned by the Multi-Attribute Utility theory was proposed to ascertain the relative contribution of the specific components of attitude and beliefs to the final decision and experience of being vaccinated against Hepatitis B infection. Results indicated that the ‘personal value of Hepatitis B vaccination’, in particular for ‘concern about the efficacy of the Hepatitis B vaccine’, ‘fear of pain from repeated injections’, ‘time’ and ‘money’, were the main determinants in relation to the uptake of the Hepatitis B vaccination. Such results were consistent with earlier findings based on the Health Belief Model. It appears that the greater the experience gained in nursing care the lower the rate of vaccination; the important items under the concept of ‘Personal value of Hepatitis B vaccination’ varied by ‘experience in nursing care’. The overall predictive validity was 67%, based on the utility decision model. When stratified by ‘experience in nursing care’, the prediction improved, ranging from 89% to 100%. Based on these findings, a specific intervention programme should be provided to change behaviour and improve the vaccination rate.

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