Attitudes towards the relevance of biological, behavioural and social sciences in nursing education

Authors

  • Tina Thornton RN DipAppSc DipTNseEd BN Med MRCNA

    Corresponding author
    1. Lecturer, School of Nursing, Queensland University of Technology, Queensland, Australia
      Tina Thornton, School of Nursing, QUT, Locked Bag No 2, Red Hill, Queensland 4051, Australia
    Search for more papers by this author

Tina Thornton, School of Nursing, QUT, Locked Bag No 2, Red Hill, Queensland 4051, Australia

Abstract

This paper explores the perceptions of staff and students regarding the supporting sciences within nursing education and how they feel such content relates to the ‘real world’ of nursing. A qualitative study examining the perceptions of students and teaching staff, particularly the concept of relevance, was conducted to explore factors which impact upon the integration of theory and practice. The teaching approaches used, assessment items selected, and the perceptions held about what nurses actually do all impinge upon what, and how, students learn in subjects which are essentially non-nursing in their orientation. Through an awareness of factors affecting how students and teaching staff actually approach supporting sciences content, better informed curriculum decisions can be made.

Ancillary