Preserving writing in doctoral education: exploring the concernful practices of schooling learning teaching

Authors


NancyDiekelmann School of Nursing, University of Wisconsin-Madison, H6/246 Clinical Science Center, 600 Highland Avenue, Madison, Wisconsin 53792-2455, USA.

Abstract

Preserving writing in doctoral education: exploring the concernful practices of schooling learning teaching¶Many contemporary scholars have challenged the current culture of graduate education and have suggested a need to reform nursing scholarship. The purpose of this study was to describe and analyse the common practices and shared lived experiences of nurses who are students or teachers in doctoral education. Participants recruited from across the United States included 15 nurses, five of whom were current faculty members in doctoral programmes in nursing and 10 who were currently enrolled as students in doctoral programmes. Data collected from extended, non-structured interviews were analysed hermeneutically using the interpretive phenomenology of Heidegger and Gadamer as the philosophical background. The results of this study reveal that the practices of scholarship, reading, writing, thinking and dialogue are inseparable and belong together. Analysing and describing how the practices of scholarship belong together will contribute to extending an understanding of how the practices of writing can be preserved in contemporary doctoral education. ‘Preserving’ refers to how teachers and students perpetuate and sustain these practices in ways that are meaningful and transformative and in ways that are oppressive. This study explores the experiences that are central to becoming a scholar and suggests how their meaningfulness can be sustained and extended into the next millennium.

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