Evidence for nursing practice: a clarification of the issues

Authors

  • Closs BSc(Hons) MPhil PhD RGN,

    1. Director of Research, Division of Nursing, School of Healthcare Studies, University of Leeds, Leeds,
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  • Cheater MA(Hons) PhD RGN

    1. Senior Lecturer (Nursing), Clinical Governance Research and Development Unit, Department of General Practice and Primary Health Care, University of Leicester, Leicester, England
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Closs Dr School of Healthcare Studies, University of Leeds, 22 Hyde Terrace, Leeds LS2 9LN, England. E-mail: s.j.closs@leeds.ac.uk

Abstract

Evidence for nursing practice: a clarification of the issues

There has been considerable confusion and unease within the nursing profession about the emphatic push for all healthcare to be ‘evidence-based’. In particular, there has been anxiety that the emphasis on evidence ignores practitioners’ skills and individual patient preferences. This paper attempts to clarify the main issues surrounding evidence-based nursing. These include its epidemiological origins and purpose, the meaning and limits of ‘evidence’, the need for individual skills and expertise in the use of evidence, and the strengths and weaknesses of different kinds of evidence. It aims to debunk the misconception that randomized controlled trials are synonymous with evidence, and to increase critical awareness of the nature of evidence in nursing.

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