Nurses’ and physicians’ narratives about long-term non-malignant pain among men

Authors


Margareta Paulson Mid Sweden University, SE-83125 Östersund, Sweden. E-mail: Margareta.Paulson@vao.mh.se

Abstract

Nurses’ and physicians’ narratives about long-term non-malignant pain among men

The aim of this study was to illuminate the meaning of skilled nurses’ and physicians’ lived experiences in their encounters with men suffering from long-term, non-malignant pain of at least 6 months duration. Seventeen nurses and four physicians participated in the study. A phenomenological-hermeneutic method was used. In the analysis three themes, ‘needing to be manly’, ‘struggling for relief from pain’ and ‘needing human support’ emerged. The phenomenon ‘confirmation’ was especially important in all three themes. This study indicates that confirmation of the theme ‘needing to be manly’ means that nurses’ and physicians’ must have such a relationship with these men that they really feel respected. Confirmation of the theme ‘struggling for relief from pain’ means that the care givers must convince these men that they really believe each unique individual’s narratives. Confirmation of the theme ‘needing human support’ means that nurses and physicians have to behave in such a way that these men are convinced that the caregivers really care about them. When the men felt confirmation they dared to disclose their pain experiences more honestly. This is a preliminary prerequisite for nurses’ and physicians’ potential to help these men.

Ancillary