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Differences between men and women on the waiting list for coronary revascularization

Authors

  • Ann Bengtson PhD RNT,

    1. Senior Lecturer, Department of Nursing, Göteborg University College of Health and Caring Sciences and Department of Heart and Lung, Wallenberglaboratoriet, Göteborg University, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Göteborg, Sweden,
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  • Thomas Karlsson MSc,

    1. Statistician, Department of Heart and Lung, Göteborg University, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Göteborg, Sweden,
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  • Johan Herlitz PhD MD

    1. Chief Physician, Associate Professor, Department of Heart and Lung, Göteborg University, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Göteborg, Sweden
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Ann Bengtson College of Health and Caring Sciences, Department of Nursing, Göteburg University, Billerudsgatan 1, SE 416 75, Göteborg, Sweden.

Abstract

Differences between men and women on the waiting list for coronary revascularization

This study aims to examine the situation for patients on the waiting list for possible coronary revascularization in terms of waiting time, treatment and various aspects of well-being in relation to gender. Patients on the waiting list for coronary angiography, percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty or coronary artery bypass grafting in September 1990 were approached with a questionnaire dealing with various aspects as described above. Of the 831 patients who participated in the evaluation, 174 (21%) were women. Although age was similar for men and women, men had a higher prevalence of previous myocardial infarction and a lower prevalence of previous hypertension. In terms of medication, women were more frequently treated with diuretics and sedatives than men. Women reported a higher frequency than men with regard to the following symptoms: chest pain at rest and at night, dyspnoea when walking, tachycardia, tiredness, headache, dizziness and sweating. Women also suffered more frequently from difficulty going to sleep, difficulty waking up, repeated awakening and insomnia. Men, on the other hand, suffered more frequently from restlessness, inability to act and irritability. Among patients on the waiting list for possible coronary revascularization, women differed from men by being more frequently treated with diuretics, reporting a higher frequency of various cardiovascular symptoms including chest pain and dyspnoea and, furthermore, reporting more sleeping disorders. Gender differences were found but they were not consistent.

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