Developing a concept analysis of control for use in child and adolescent mental health nursing

Authors

  • Susan Croom MSc BA(Hons) RGN,

    1. Senior Lecturer/Practitioner in Child and Adolescent Mental Health Nursing, Newcastle City Health Care Trust and University of Northumbria, England,
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  • Susan Procter PhD RGN BSc(Hons) CertEd,

    1. Professor of Nursing Development, University of Northumbria and Newcastle City Health Care Trust, England,
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  • Ann Le Couteur BSc MBBS FRC Psych FRCPCH

    1. Professor of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Child and Adolescent Mental Health Unit, Newcastle City Health Care Trust and Newcastle University Medical School, Newcastle, England
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Susan Procter Faculty of Health Social Work and Education, University of Northumbria,, Coach Lane Campus (East), Newcastle upon Tyne NE7 7XA, England. E-mail: susan.procter@unn.ac.uk

Abstract

Developing a concept analysis of control for use in child and adolescent mental health nursing

The need to help children and young people with significant mental health problems develop a sense of personal control in their everyday lives, in a manner which does not endanger themselves or others, was recognized by nurse practitioners working in an English regional multidisciplinary child and adolescent mental health residential unit. A concept analysis of control was undertaken and used to develop a framework for analysing control. This deductive framework was modified iteratively by nurses who developed new knowledge from a qualitative exploration of current practice and the application of the evolving framework to practice problems. The paper describes this process and highlights three main findings: (i) the evolving attributes of the concept analysis helped nurses steer a course through the complexities of practice; (ii) the research highlighted and enabled nurses to confront the paradoxical nature of control; (iii) the process enabled nurses to recognize the mutuality of feelings aroused simultaneously when both the nurse and the child are challenged to maintain personal control.

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