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‘You feel helpless, that’s exactly it’: parents’ and young people’s control beliefs about bed-wetting and the implications for practice

Authors


Morison School of Social and Health Sciences, University of Abertay Dundee, Marketgait House, Marketgait, Dundee DD1 1NJ, Scotland.

Abstract

‘You feel helpless, that’s exactly it’: parents’ and young people’s control beliefs about bed-wetting and the implications for practice

Young people wet the bed when they fail to wake up to a full bladder. The causes of bed-wetting are far from certain and this uncertainty is reflected in the diversity of treatments on offer and the lack of any guarantee that treatment will work in a particular case. Most young people are sad and ashamed about the bed-wetting and want it to stop, but they vary widely in their belief in their own capacity to influence the situation, and in their optimism about what the future holds. The problem can persist into adolescence or even adulthood, with far reaching social and emotional consequences, both for the young people and their families. In an ethnographic study involving 19 families ‘perceived helplessness’ emerged as a key issue permeating the whole system and often activating a downward spiral, leading to abdication of effort and responsibility by the young people themselves, by their parents and sometimes by health care professionals. Informed by the insights gained from this study and an extensive review of the literature on perceived control the Family Perspectives on Bed Wetting Questionnaire has been developed to explore family members’ feelings, degree of concern and dimensions of perceived control relating to: effort, ability, luck, important others and the unknown. This questionnaire was used as a basis for structured interviews with family members in a longitudinal survey, involving 40 families attending one of nine community-based, nurse-led enuresis clinics in Greater Glasgow. It was found that only 38% of the young people were entering into treatment with the belief that they had the ability to be dry at night. This became self-fulfilling, with only 33% achieving initial success of 14 consecutive dry nights in a 16-week period (chi-squared test, P=0·029). Seventy per cent of young people felt that luck was important, while most parents felt that luck had little part to play. Implications for practice include the need to assess the families’ readiness to engage in treatment, to create opportunities for effective control and to encourage realistic expectations.

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