Systematized HIV/AIDS education for student nurses at the University of Ibadan, Nigeria: impact on knowledge, attitudes and compliance with universal precautions

Authors


Charles Uwakwe Department of Educational Foundations, University of Botswana, Private Bag 0022, Gaborone, Botswana. E-mail: uwakwecb@mopipi.ub.bw

Abstract

Systematized HIV/AIDS education for student nurses at the University of Ibadan, Nigeria: impact on knowledge, attitudes and compliance with universal precautions

This paper reports the findings of a study which examines changes in a group of Bachelor of Science (BSc) nursing students’ perceptions, knowledge of and attitudes towards human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS), accruing from attempts at a systematized education for the cohort. Based upon a 3-month study of 141 registered nurses enrolled in a BSc nursing programme at the University of Ibadan, Nigeria, it investigates alterations in knowledge and attitudes resulting from intense instruction on HIV/AIDS, AIDS patient care, and compliance with universal precautions. With regard to knowledge enhancement and attitudinal transformation, the research reveals that a number of positive changes occurred over the period of the study. Not only were the nurses better informed about AIDS than previously, but their attitudes towards the disease and patient care had become considerably more liberal, as well as their disposition to comply with universal precautions. The conclusion emphasizes that it is very important for education about HIV/AIDS to be incorporated within current undergraduate and in-service training programmes for Nigerian nurses.

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