Women recovering from first-time myocardial infarction (MI): a feminist qualitative study

Authors

  • Debra Jackson RN PhD,

    1. Senior Lecturer, Division of Nursing, Faculty of Health, UWS Macarthur, Campbelltown, AustraliaProfessor of Nursing and Head, Division of Nursing, Faculty of Health, UWS Macarthur, Campbelltown, AustraliaAssociate Clinical Professor of Nursing, UWS Macarthur and Clinical Nurse Consultant, Department of Cardiology, St George Hospital, AustraliaAssociate Professor and Head, Department of Clinical Nursing, Faculty of Nursing, University of Sydney, AustraliaProfessor and Dean, Faculty of Health Science, Australian Catholic University, AustraliaConjoint Lecturer in Nursing, Division of Nursing, Faculty of Health, UWS Macarthur, CNC (Cardiology) Bankstown Hospital, Sydney, AustraliaLecturer in Pathophysiology, Faculty of Health, UWS Macarthur, Campbelltown, AustraliaLecturer in Nursing, Division of Nursing, Faculty of Health, UWS Macarthur, Campbelltown, Australia
    Search for more papers by this author
  • John Daly RN PhD,

    1. Senior Lecturer, Division of Nursing, Faculty of Health, UWS Macarthur, Campbelltown, AustraliaProfessor of Nursing and Head, Division of Nursing, Faculty of Health, UWS Macarthur, Campbelltown, AustraliaAssociate Clinical Professor of Nursing, UWS Macarthur and Clinical Nurse Consultant, Department of Cardiology, St George Hospital, AustraliaAssociate Professor and Head, Department of Clinical Nursing, Faculty of Nursing, University of Sydney, AustraliaProfessor and Dean, Faculty of Health Science, Australian Catholic University, AustraliaConjoint Lecturer in Nursing, Division of Nursing, Faculty of Health, UWS Macarthur, CNC (Cardiology) Bankstown Hospital, Sydney, AustraliaLecturer in Pathophysiology, Faculty of Health, UWS Macarthur, Campbelltown, AustraliaLecturer in Nursing, Division of Nursing, Faculty of Health, UWS Macarthur, Campbelltown, Australia
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Patricia Davidson RN MEd,

    1. Senior Lecturer, Division of Nursing, Faculty of Health, UWS Macarthur, Campbelltown, AustraliaProfessor of Nursing and Head, Division of Nursing, Faculty of Health, UWS Macarthur, Campbelltown, AustraliaAssociate Clinical Professor of Nursing, UWS Macarthur and Clinical Nurse Consultant, Department of Cardiology, St George Hospital, AustraliaAssociate Professor and Head, Department of Clinical Nursing, Faculty of Nursing, University of Sydney, AustraliaProfessor and Dean, Faculty of Health Science, Australian Catholic University, AustraliaConjoint Lecturer in Nursing, Division of Nursing, Faculty of Health, UWS Macarthur, CNC (Cardiology) Bankstown Hospital, Sydney, AustraliaLecturer in Pathophysiology, Faculty of Health, UWS Macarthur, Campbelltown, AustraliaLecturer in Nursing, Division of Nursing, Faculty of Health, UWS Macarthur, Campbelltown, Australia
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Doug Elliott RN PhD,

    1. Senior Lecturer, Division of Nursing, Faculty of Health, UWS Macarthur, Campbelltown, AustraliaProfessor of Nursing and Head, Division of Nursing, Faculty of Health, UWS Macarthur, Campbelltown, AustraliaAssociate Clinical Professor of Nursing, UWS Macarthur and Clinical Nurse Consultant, Department of Cardiology, St George Hospital, AustraliaAssociate Professor and Head, Department of Clinical Nursing, Faculty of Nursing, University of Sydney, AustraliaProfessor and Dean, Faculty of Health Science, Australian Catholic University, AustraliaConjoint Lecturer in Nursing, Division of Nursing, Faculty of Health, UWS Macarthur, CNC (Cardiology) Bankstown Hospital, Sydney, AustraliaLecturer in Pathophysiology, Faculty of Health, UWS Macarthur, Campbelltown, AustraliaLecturer in Nursing, Division of Nursing, Faculty of Health, UWS Macarthur, Campbelltown, Australia
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Elizabeth Cameron-Traub RN BA(Hons) PhD,

    1. Senior Lecturer, Division of Nursing, Faculty of Health, UWS Macarthur, Campbelltown, AustraliaProfessor of Nursing and Head, Division of Nursing, Faculty of Health, UWS Macarthur, Campbelltown, AustraliaAssociate Clinical Professor of Nursing, UWS Macarthur and Clinical Nurse Consultant, Department of Cardiology, St George Hospital, AustraliaAssociate Professor and Head, Department of Clinical Nursing, Faculty of Nursing, University of Sydney, AustraliaProfessor and Dean, Faculty of Health Science, Australian Catholic University, AustraliaConjoint Lecturer in Nursing, Division of Nursing, Faculty of Health, UWS Macarthur, CNC (Cardiology) Bankstown Hospital, Sydney, AustraliaLecturer in Pathophysiology, Faculty of Health, UWS Macarthur, Campbelltown, AustraliaLecturer in Nursing, Division of Nursing, Faculty of Health, UWS Macarthur, Campbelltown, Australia
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Vicki Wade RN BHSc MN,

    1. Senior Lecturer, Division of Nursing, Faculty of Health, UWS Macarthur, Campbelltown, AustraliaProfessor of Nursing and Head, Division of Nursing, Faculty of Health, UWS Macarthur, Campbelltown, AustraliaAssociate Clinical Professor of Nursing, UWS Macarthur and Clinical Nurse Consultant, Department of Cardiology, St George Hospital, AustraliaAssociate Professor and Head, Department of Clinical Nursing, Faculty of Nursing, University of Sydney, AustraliaProfessor and Dean, Faculty of Health Science, Australian Catholic University, AustraliaConjoint Lecturer in Nursing, Division of Nursing, Faculty of Health, UWS Macarthur, CNC (Cardiology) Bankstown Hospital, Sydney, AustraliaLecturer in Pathophysiology, Faculty of Health, UWS Macarthur, Campbelltown, AustraliaLecturer in Nursing, Division of Nursing, Faculty of Health, UWS Macarthur, Campbelltown, Australia
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Christine Chin RN BHSc DipN(Lond)MEd,

    1. Senior Lecturer, Division of Nursing, Faculty of Health, UWS Macarthur, Campbelltown, AustraliaProfessor of Nursing and Head, Division of Nursing, Faculty of Health, UWS Macarthur, Campbelltown, AustraliaAssociate Clinical Professor of Nursing, UWS Macarthur and Clinical Nurse Consultant, Department of Cardiology, St George Hospital, AustraliaAssociate Professor and Head, Department of Clinical Nursing, Faculty of Nursing, University of Sydney, AustraliaProfessor and Dean, Faculty of Health Science, Australian Catholic University, AustraliaConjoint Lecturer in Nursing, Division of Nursing, Faculty of Health, UWS Macarthur, CNC (Cardiology) Bankstown Hospital, Sydney, AustraliaLecturer in Pathophysiology, Faculty of Health, UWS Macarthur, Campbelltown, AustraliaLecturer in Nursing, Division of Nursing, Faculty of Health, UWS Macarthur, Campbelltown, Australia
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Yenna Salamonson RN BSc MA

    1. Senior Lecturer, Division of Nursing, Faculty of Health, UWS Macarthur, Campbelltown, AustraliaProfessor of Nursing and Head, Division of Nursing, Faculty of Health, UWS Macarthur, Campbelltown, AustraliaAssociate Clinical Professor of Nursing, UWS Macarthur and Clinical Nurse Consultant, Department of Cardiology, St George Hospital, AustraliaAssociate Professor and Head, Department of Clinical Nursing, Faculty of Nursing, University of Sydney, AustraliaProfessor and Dean, Faculty of Health Science, Australian Catholic University, AustraliaConjoint Lecturer in Nursing, Division of Nursing, Faculty of Health, UWS Macarthur, CNC (Cardiology) Bankstown Hospital, Sydney, AustraliaLecturer in Pathophysiology, Faculty of Health, UWS Macarthur, Campbelltown, AustraliaLecturer in Nursing, Division of Nursing, Faculty of Health, UWS Macarthur, Campbelltown, Australia
    Search for more papers by this author

Debra Jackson, Senior Lecturer, Division of Nursing, Faculty of Health, UWS Macarthur, PO Box 555, Campbelltown, NSW 2560, Australia. E-mail: de.jackson@uws.edu.au

Abstract

Women recovering from first-time myocardial infarction (MI): a feminist qualitative study

Although myocardial infarction (MI) is a leading cause of death and disablement for women internationally, little is known about women’s recovery. This paper describes an exploratory descriptive study that was informed by feminist principles, and which aimed to explore the recovery experiences of a group of women survivors of first-time MI in the initial period following discharge from hospital. A total of 10 female survivors were interviewed using an open-ended semi-structured interview schedule administered at 7, 14 and 21 days post-hospital discharge. Findings revealed that recovery was experienced as a complex process, initially characterized by fear and uncertainty. Over the duration of the study these feelings were replaced with a more positive outlook, a return of energy, and a sense of confidence in the future. Participants identified an unmet need for reliable information which persisted over the duration of the study. The findings of this study have implications for nursing practice and research. Chief among these is the issue of effective provision of information to women following an acute MI. The importance of providing relevant information to be understood and retained by people experiencing crisis cannot be overstated. Equally important are the provision of opportunities for patients to have regular contact with health professionals to question and seek clarifying information. These findings should now be tested on larger populations.

Ancillary