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Development and testing of the parental coping strategy inventory (PCSI) with children with cancer in Taiwan

Authors


Chao-Hsing Yeh, Graduate Institute of Nursing Science, Chang Gung University, 259 Wen-Hwa 1 Road, Kwei-San, Tao-Yuen, Taiwan. E-mail: cyeh@mail.cgu.edu.tw

Abstract

Development and testing of the parental coping strategy inventory (PCSI) with children with cancer in Taiwan

Rationale. This study describes the development and psychometric testing of the parental coping strategy inventory (PCSI).

Methods. The PCSI was developed on the basis of previous qualitative study on the Taiwanese parental adaptation process, when caring for children with cancer. In order to develop the measure of parental coping strategy inventory (PCSI), relevant parameters or items for the assessment subscales were then identified and tested in a three-stage process: item development, content validity testing and reliability testing. The PCSI consisted of 48 items in 12 scales after item selection, and the internal consistency of the scales were acceptable. In order to test the psychometric characteristics of the PCSI, data were collected from 183 mothers with children with cancer.

Results. Confirmatory factor analysis supported a good overall model fit of the construct validity of PCSI. In order to test the generalizability of the factor structure, mothers with children with epilepsy were used. The factorial validity of PCSI was supported from the population of those mothers with children with epilepsy.

Conclusions. This version of the PCSI was developed with an explicit prior conceptual model based on grounded qualitative study findings. The PCSI is a specified coping behaviour measure with the conceptual framework that adaptation problems can be solved through specific coping strategies. It can be administered in 20 minutes and is the first documented measure of the adaptation process administered directly to Taiwanese parents. It demonstrates acceptable psychometric properties and could be used as a quick screening instrument in evaluating parental problems when caring for children with cancer as well as chronic illness (such as epilepsy, as tested). It could also be used as a predictor of parental adaptation outcome. This report presents preliminary data on the initial instrument development and psychometric properties of PCSI.

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