The meaning of suicidal psychiatric inpatients’ experiences of being treated by physicians

Authors

  • Anne-Greth Talseth RNT MSc,

    1. PhD Student, Tromsø College, Faculty of Health Sciences, Tromsø, Norway; Department of Psychiatry, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden; Department of Nursing, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden
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  • Jacobsson MD PhD,

    1. PhD Student, Tromsø College, Faculty of Health Sciences, Tromsø, Norway; Department of Psychiatry, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden; Department of Nursing, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden
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  • Norberg RN PhD

    1. PhD Student, Tromsø College, Faculty of Health Sciences, Tromsø, Norway; Department of Psychiatry, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden; Department of Nursing, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden
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Abstract

The meaning of suicidal psychiatric inpatients’ experiences of being treated by physicians

Twenty-one psychiatric inpatients who had thought about, expressed a wish to, or even attempted to commit suicide narrated their experiences of receiving treatment from physicians. The interview texts were transcribed and interpreted using a phenomenological-hermeneutic method inspired by the philosophy of Ricoeur. Two main themes and eight themes were found. Participating Approach: being with the patients, listening to patients without prejudice, trusting each other, respecting patients’ integrity; and Observing Approach: leaving patients to themselves, listening to patients with prejudice, mistrusting each other, not respecting patients’ integrity. These findings were interpreted in the light of the writings of Hegel, Buber and Cissna and Sieburg. The suicidal patients expressed their need for confirmation in their interaction with physicians, that is they needed to meet with respect and interest when staying in the hospital with suicidal thoughts or after suicidal attempts.

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