Intravascular administration sets are accurate and in appropriate condition after 7 days of continuous use: an  in vitro study

Authors

  • Claire M. Rickard BN RN,

    1. Research Assistant, School of Rural Health, Monash University, Traralgon, Australia, and Postgraduate Student, School of Nursing, Queensland University of Technology, Australia,
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  • Steven C. Wallis BSc PhD,

    1. Project Officer, Department of Intensive Care, Royal Brisbane Hospital, Brisbane, Australia, and Scientific Officer, Department of Anaesthesiology and Critical Care, University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia,
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  • Mary Courtney BComm MHlthPlan PhD RN RM,

    1. Director, Centre for Nursing Research, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, Australia,
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  • Jeff Lipman MBBCh DA FFA,

    1. Director, Department of Intensive Care, Royal Brisbane Hospital, Brisbane, Australia, and Associate Professor, Department of Anaesthesiology and Critical Care, University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia,
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  • Peter J.P. Daley BHSc RN

    1. Clinical Nurse Consultant, Department of Intensive Care, Royal Brisbane Hospital, Brisbane, Australia
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Claire Rickard, School of Rural Health, Monash University, PO Box 424, Traralgon Vic 3844, Australia. E-mail: claire.rickard@med.monash.edu.au

Abstract

Intravascular administration sets are accurate and in appropriate condition after 7 days of continuous use: anin vitro study

Background. The ideal duration of intravascular administration set use is unknown. Studies have compared the infective implications of 1–7 days of use. The Centers for Disease Control recommend at least 3 days usage. No previous study has evaluated the accuracy of volume delivery or integrity of administration sets after prolonged use.

Aim. To evaluate the accuracy and condition of intravascular administration sets used continuously for 7 days.

Design. Prospective, randomized, experimental study in the laboratory setting.

Methods. Four administration sets were randomly assigned to deliver 2 mL/hour (IMED® syringe set 2280–0000), 20, 50 or 100 mL/hour (IMED® infusion sets 2210–0500) of crystalloid solution continuously for 7 days through an IMED® Gemini® four channel infusion pump (PC4). At study commencement and daily for 7 days, a 4-hour volume measurement and an inspection for leaks/erosion of administration sets occurred for each administration set (total measurements = 32).

Results. Mean volume outputs over 4 hours were 7·84 mL (2 mL/hour), 80·66 mL (20 mL/hour), 205·35 (50 mL/hour) and 406·37 (100 mL/hour). These differed significantly from the programmed volumes (P=0·00–0·01). Usage duration did not influence performance (F=0·866, P=0·55). Accuracy of volume delivery differed significantly with pump speed (F=106·933, P < 0·001) exhibiting increased volume to 50 mL/hour then a reduction at 100 mL/hour. Differences were within manufacturer specifications (±5%) and were clinically acceptable. All administration sets remained in appropriate condition displaying no leakage or erosion.

Conclusion. There were small inaccuracies found between programmed and delivered volumes, however, there was no deterioration in performance over time. This suggests that inaccuracies were because of normal pump performance rather than the administration sets. Administration sets retain acceptable accuracy and condition after 7 days continuous use. Further research should assess the infective and other impacts of prolonged usage.

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