Community perspective on a model to reduce teenage pregnancy

Authors



Marian Tabi,
School of Nursing,
Georgia Southern University,
PO Box 8158,
Statesboro,
Georgia 30460,
USA.
E-mail: mtabi@gasou.edu

Abstract

Design. Qualitative methodology was used to validate elements of an educational career youth developmental model (ECYDM) to reduce teenage pregnancy among African American teens in two inner city urban communities. The specific aims of the study were to gain understanding of the factors contributing to teenage pregnancy and to identify a pregnancy prevention programme relevant to the needs of African American youth.

Methods. Data were collected from a convenience purposive sample of 43 African American teens and adults. Teen participants included males and non-pregnant, pregnant, and parent females. Adult participants included parents, school staff, and community clergies. Data were collected using demographic questionnaires, structured individual and focus group interviews. Approval from the Institutional Review Board was obtained before conducting the study.

Findings. Findings supported elements of the ECYDM as a pregnancy prevention programme for African American teens in inner city urban communities. Participants identified an educational-career motivational programme that utilizes mentoring to teach, counsel, and provide information to improve youths' health, education, career, and social outcomes as the pregnancy prevention programme for youth in urban communities.

Conclusions. These findings have important implications for future programme design and research. Teenage pregnancy must be addressed within the context of the individual, family, and community. Community partnership and collaboration of resources is necessary to reduce teenage pregnancy. Educational-career programmes are needed to provide information and knowledge to young men and women to make sound informed decisions. Continued qualitative research is also needed to gain understanding of pregnancy prevention programmes.

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