Effects of a self-management course for patients with systemic lupus erythematosus

Authors



Kyeong Yae Sohng,
College of Nursing,
The Catholic University of Korea,
505 Banpo-dong Socho-gu,
Seoul,137-701,
South Korea.
E-mail: sky@catholic.ac.kr

Abstract

Background. For people living with systemic lupus erythematosus, the disease's potential variety and severity of manifestations and unpredictable course present challenges and repercussions in all arenas of life.

Aim. A quasi-experimental study was conducted to examine the effects of a systemic lupus erythematosus self-management course for Korean patients on fatigue, coping skills, self-efficacy, depression, pain and disease activity.

Methods. In a two-group pre- and post-test design, a total of 41 participants were assigned to the experimental group (21 participants) and to the control group (20 participants). The experimental group received six weekly 2-hour sessions for groups of 10–15 literate adults of all ages, while the control group did not receive any intervention. Outcome measures included fatigue, coping skills, self-efficacy, depression, pain and disease activity.

Results. Patients who participated in the self-management course showed significant improvement in fatigue (P = 0·049), coping skills (P = 0·007), self-efficacy (P = 0·001), and depression (P = 0·025). There were no significant changes in pain and disease activity after the intervention.

Conclusions. The systemic lupus erythematosus self-management course had effects in reducing fatigue and depression and improving coping skills and self-efficacy. This course is potentially a good nursing intervention that can be offered in community settings.

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