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Keywords:

  • nurses;
  • telephone calls;
  • glycosylated haemoglobin;
  • adherence;
  • type 2 diabetes

Background. Type 2 diabetes mellitus is increasing in incidence and research has shown that normalization of blood glucose levels can moderate the risk of microvascular and neurological complications.

Aim. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of nurse telephone calls on glycosylated haemoglobin (HbA1c) levels and adherence to diabetes control recommendations.

Methods. A randomized design with control and experimental groups being assessed pre- and postintervention was used to assess the effectiveness of nurse telephone calls. Twenty patients were randomly assigned to an intervention group and 16 to a control group. The goal of the intervention was to keep blood glucose concentrations close to the normal range (HbA1c < 7%). The intervention was applied to the intervention group for 12 weeks, and consisted of continued education and reinforcement of diet, exercise, medication adjustment recommendations, as well as frequent self-monitoring of blood glucose levels. Telephone intervention was performed twice per week for the first month and then weekly for the second and third month. Participants were requested to write self-management logs including blood glucose levels, diet and an exercise diary. A dietitian analysed the diet diaries and participants were informed about their results by telephone or mail. All medication adjustments were communicated to participants’ doctors. The HbA1c and diabetes adherence were measured before and after the intervention.

Results. Patients in the intervention group had a mean decrease of 1·2% in HbA1c levels and those in the control group had a mean increase of 0·6% in HbA1c levels. The intervention group had greater diet and blood glucose testing adherence than the control group.

Conclusion. These findings indicate that a nurse telephone intervention can improve HbA1c, and diet and blood glucose testing adherence.