Comparative foraging and nutrition of horses and cattle in European wetlands

Authors

  • Catherine Menard,

    1. Centre d’Etudes Biologiques de Chizé, CNRS UPR 134, 79360 Beauvoir-sur-Niort, France;
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  • Patrick Duncan,

    Corresponding author
    1. Centre d’Etudes Biologiques de Chizé, CNRS UPR 134, 79360 Beauvoir-sur-Niort, France;
    2. Station Biologique de la Tour du Valat, Le Sambuc, 13200 Arles, France and
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  • Geraldine Fleurance,

    1. Centre d’Etudes Biologiques de Chizé, CNRS UPR 134, 79360 Beauvoir-sur-Niort, France;
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    • Present address: Les Haras Nationaux–Direction du Développement, Domaine de la Valade, 19370 Chamberet, France.

  • Jean-Yves Georges,

    1. Centre d’Etudes Biologiques de Chizé, CNRS UPR 134, 79360 Beauvoir-sur-Niort, France;
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  • Marc Lila

    1. Institut National de la Recherche Agronomique, UR889 Unité d’Amélioration des Ressources Fourragères, route de Saintes, 86600 Lusignan, France
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P. Duncan, Centre d’Etudes Biologiques de Chizé, CNRS UPR 1934, 79360 Beauvoir-sur-Niort, France (fax + 33 549 09 6526; e-mail duncan@cebc.cnrs.fr).

Summary

  • 1Equids are generalist herbivores that co-exist with bovids of similar body size in many ecosystems. There are two major hypotheses to explain their co-existence, but few comparative data are available to test them. The first postulates that the very different functioning of their digestive tracts leads to fundamentally different patterns of use of grasses of different fibre contents. The second postulates resource partitioning through the use of different plant species. As domestic horses and cattle are used widely in Europe for the management of conservation areas, particularly in wetlands, a good knowledge of their foraging behaviour and comparative nutrition is necessary.
  • 2In this paper we describe resource-use by horses and cattle in complementary studies in two French wetlands. Horses used marshes intensively during the warmer seasons; both species used grasslands intensively throughout the year; cattle used forbs and shrubs much more than horses. Niche breadth was similar and overlap was high (Kulczinski’s index 0·58–0·77). Horses spent much more time feeding on short grass than cattle. These results from the two sites indicate strong potential for competition.
  • 3Comparative daily food intake, measured in the field during this study for the first time, was 63% higher in horses (144 gDM kg W−0·75 day−1) than in cattle (88 gDM kg W−0·75 day−1). Digestibility of the cattle diets was a little higher, but daily intake of digestible dry matter (i.e. nutrient extraction) in all seasons was considerably higher in horses (78 gDM kg W−0·75 day−1) than in cattle (51 gDM kg W−0·75 day−1). When food is limiting, horses should outcompete cattle in habitats dominated by grasses because their functional response is steeper; under these circumstances cattle will require an ecological refuge for survival during winter, woodland or shrubland with abundant dicotyledons.
  • 4Horses are a good tool for plant management because they remove more vegetation per unit body weight than cattle, and use the most productive plant communities and plant species (especially graminoids) to a greater extent. They feed closer to the ground, and maintain a mosaic of patches of short and tall grass that contributes to structural diversity at this scale. Cattle use broadleaved plants to a greater extent than horses, and can reduce the rate of encroachment by certain woody species.

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