Comforting strategies used during nasogastric tube insertion

Authors

  • JANICE PENROD BSN, MS, RN,

    1. Research Associate, School of Nursing, The Pennsylvania State University,
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  • JANICE M. MORSE BS, MS, MA, PhD (Nurs), PhD (Anthro), FAAN,

    1. Professor, Faculty of Nursing and Director, International Institute for Quafitative Methodology, University of Alberta Adjunct Professor, School of Nursing, The Pennsylvania State University,
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  • SHARON WILSON BScN, MEd, MN, RN

    1. Research Associate. School of Nursing, The Pennsylvania State University, Professor. School of Nursing, Ryerson Polytechnic University
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Morse International Institute for Qualitative Methodology, University of Alberta, 8303-112 Street, Edmonton, AB, Canada T6G 2K4.

Abstract

• Nasogastric tube insertion is a procedure that commonly involves discomfort, yet requires the cooperation of the conscious patient.

• This study employed qualitative ethology to investigate how comforting strategies were used during the insertion of nasogastric tubes in trauma care.

• Practitioners used eight direct and indirect comforting strategies in uniquely patterned styles (technical, affective and blended).

• In addition, a form of `team comforting' was implemented as multiple trauma team members made a concerted effort to complete the procedure.

• Further study is needed to explicate how the nurse's style affects the behavioural state displayed by the patient.

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