Forest fragmentation effects on palm diversity in central Amazonia

Authors

  • Aldicir Scariot

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      *Present address and correspondence: CENARGEN/ EMBRAPA, C. P. 02372, 70.770–900 Brasília, DF, Brasil (fax + 55 61 340–3624; e-mail scariot@cenargen. embrapa.br).
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*Present address and correspondence: CENARGEN/ EMBRAPA, C. P. 02372, 70.770–900 Brasília, DF, Brasil (fax + 55 61 340–3624; e-mail scariot@cenargen. embrapa.br).

Abstract

1 The effects of fragmentation on quantitative measures of floristic diversity in a palm community were examined in the Biological Dynamics of Forest Fragments study area in central Amazonia. Three 1-ha, three 10-ha, two 100-ha and three continuous forest reserves, distributed among three sites, were surveyed. In each reserve, 10 20 × 20 m plots were sampled, resulting in a total of 110 plots representing 4.4 sampled hectares.

2 The taxon composition of this palm community was dominated by stemmed, understorey palms. A total of 23 225 individuals from 36 taxa was recorded; five of the taxa were not sampled in continuous forest.

3 Taxa richness did not vary across reserve size or sites unless taxa not sampled in the continuous forest were removed from the analysis. Smaller forest fragments then harboured fewer taxa in the seedling stage than large forest fragments or continuous forest, despite the short time since isolation (10–15 years). There was a significant effect of location on the number of taxa per plot for all life stages, but only seedling and total were significantly affected by reserve size.

4 Reserve size did not affect the Shannon and Evenness indices. Reserves of similar sizes were floristically more similar than reserves of very different sizes.

5 Palms are important for the structure and composition of the forest. Their conservation may require the establishment of a number of large reserves.

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