The Edinburgh Principles with accompanying guidelines and recommendations

Authors

  • H. Wilkinson,

    1. Centre for Social Research on Dementia, Department of Applied Social Science, Faculty of Human Sciences, University of Stirling, Stirling, UK
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  • M. P. Janicki

    1. Department of Disability and Human Development, and RRTC on Aging and Developmental Disabilities, College of Health and Human Development Sciences, University of Chicago at Illinois, Chicago, Illinois, USA
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Dr Heather Wilkinson, Centre for Social Research on Dementia, Department of Applied Social Science, Faculty of Human Sciences, University of Stirling, Stirling FK9 4LA, UK (e-mail: h.a.wilkinson@stirling.ac.uk)

Abstract

A panel of experts attending a 3-day meeting held in Edinburgh, UK, in February 2001 was charged with producing a set of principles outlining the rights and needs of people with intellectual disability (ID) and dementia, and defining service practices which would enhance the supports available to them. The Edinburgh Principles, seven statements identifying a foundation for the design and support of services to people with ID affected by dementia, and their carers, were the outcome of this meeting. The accompanying guidelines and recommendations document provides an elaboration of the key points associated with the Principles and is structured toward a four-point approach: (1) adopting a workable philosophy of care; (2) adapting practices at the point of service delivery; (3) working out the coordination of diverse systems; and (4) promoting relevant research. It is expected that the Principles will be adopted by service organizations world-wide, and that the accompanying document will provide a useful and detailed baseline from which further discussions, research efforts and practice development can progress.

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