Mitochondrial DNA variation in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) across its native range: testing biogeographical hypotheses and their relevance to conservation

Authors

  • Megan R. McCusker,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Zoology and Native Fish Research Group, University of British Columbia, 6270 University Blvd., Vancouver, B.C., Canada, V6T 1Z4,
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  • Eric Parkinson,

    1. B.C. Ministry of Fisheries Research and Development Section, University of British Columbia, 2204 Main Mall, Vancouver, B.C., V6T 1Z4
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  • Eric B. Taylor

    1. Department of Zoology and Native Fish Research Group, University of British Columbia, 6270 University Blvd., Vancouver, B.C., Canada, V6T 1Z4,
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Megan R. McCusker. Fax: +604 822 9152; E-mail:megan.mccusker@gems6.gov.bc.ca

Abstract

North-western North America has been repeatedly glaciated over most of the past two million years, with the most recent glaciation occurring between 60 000 and 10 000 years ago. Intraspecific genetic variation in many species has been shaped by where they survived glaciation and what postglacial recolonization routes were used. In this study, molecular techniques were used to investigate biogeographical, taxonomic and conservation issues in rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss. Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) variation was assessed using a restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis, focusing mainly on the previously understudied northern extent of the species’ range. Two phylogenetically distinct mitochondrial lineages were found that differed from each other by up to 1.8% in sequence. Although the geographical distributions of the two clades overlap extensively, diversity and distributional analyses strongly suggest that trout survived glaciation in both coastal and inland refugia followed by postglacial gene flow and secondary contact. Postglacial dispersal into British Columbia most likely occurred from the Queen Charlotte Islands and the Columbia River. Although trout most likely also survived glaciation along the coast of Washington, Oregon and California, as well as near the Bering Strait, evidence suggests that dispersal into British Columbia from these areas was limited. Sequence analysis of mitochondrial haplotypes revealed higher diversity in California than in the northern part of the species’ range, indicating an ancient presence of the species in the south. Phylogeographic divergence probably predates adaptive variation in the species as suggested by evidence for parallel evolution of life history types across the range of O. mykiss.

Ancillary