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Armadillos exhibit less genetic polymorphism in North America than in South America: nuclear and mitochondrial data confirm a founder effect in Dasypus novemcinctus (Xenarthra)

Authors

  • Dorothée Huchon,

    1. Laboratoire de Paléontologie, Paléobiologie et Phylogénie — CC064, Institut des Sciences de l’Evolution UMR 5554/CNRS, Université Montpellier II; Place E. Bataillon, 34 095 Montpellier Cedex 05, France
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    • *

      These authors contributed equally to this work.

  • Frédéric Delsuc,

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      These authors contributed equally to this work.

  • François M. Catzeflis,

    1. Laboratoire de Paléontologie, Paléobiologie et Phylogénie — CC064, Institut des Sciences de l’Evolution UMR 5554/CNRS, Université Montpellier II; Place E. Bataillon, 34 095 Montpellier Cedex 05, France
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  • Emmanuel J. P. Douzery

    Corresponding author
    1. Laboratoire de Paléontologie, Paléobiologie et Phylogénie — CC064, Institut des Sciences de l’Evolution UMR 5554/CNRS, Université Montpellier II; Place E. Bataillon, 34 095 Montpellier Cedex 05, France
      E. J. P. Douzery. Fax: +33 4 67 14 36 10; E-mail:douzery@isem.univ-montp2.fr
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E. J. P. Douzery. Fax: +33 4 67 14 36 10; E-mail:douzery@isem.univ-montp2.fr

Abstract

Heterozygosity at eight nuclear enzymatic loci and mitochondrial DNA control region (D-loop) sequence polymorphism was compared between North and South American nine-banded armadillos (Dasypus novemcinctus: Xenarthra, Dasypodidae). All markers revealed a striking genetic homogeneity amongst Texas, Louisiana, and Mississippi individuals, vs. the usual level of polymorphism for the French Guiana population. This may reflect a founder effect during colonization of North America. Occurrence of polymorphism in the D-loop microsatellite motif of North American armadillos suggests a recent recovery of mitochondrial variability. Phylogeographic analyses using Dasypus kappleri as outgroup provides evidence for a clear separation between North and South American control region haplotypes.

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