Involvement of two A-factor receptor homologues in Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2) in the regulation of secondary metabolism and morphogenesis

Authors

  • Hiroyasu Onaka,

    1. Department of Biotechnology, Graduate School of Agriculture and Life Sciences, The University of Tokyo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8657, Japan.
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  • Taishiro Nakagawa,

    1. Department of Biotechnology, Graduate School of Agriculture and Life Sciences, The University of Tokyo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8657, Japan.
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  • Sueharu Horinouchi

    1. Department of Biotechnology, Graduate School of Agriculture and Life Sciences, The University of Tokyo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8657, Japan.
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Sueharu Horinouchi. E-mail asuhori@hongo.ecc.u-tokyo.ac.jp; Tel. (03) 3812 2111, ext. 5123; Fax (03) 5802 2931.

Abstract

Nucleotide sequences homologous to arpA encoding the A-factor receptor protein (ArpA) of Streptomyces griseus are distributed in a wide variety of streptomycetes. Two genes, cprA and cprB, each encoding an ArpA-like protein were found and cloned from Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2). CprA and CprB shared 90.7% identity in amino acid sequence and both showed about 35% identity to ArpA. Disruption of cprA by use of an M13 phage-derived single-stranded vector resulted in severe reduction of actinorhodin and undecylprodigiosin production. In addition, the timing of sporulation in the cprA disruptants was delayed by 1 day. The cprA gene thus appeared to act as a positive regulator or an accelerator for secondary metabolite formation and sporulation. Consistent with this idea, introduction of cprA on a low-copy-number plasmid into the parental strain led to overproduction of these secondary metabolites and accelerated the timing of sporulation. On the other hand, cprB disruption resulted in precocious and overproduction of actinorhodin. However, almost no effect on undecylprodigiosin was detected in the cprB disruptants. Sporulation of the cprB disruptant began 1 day earlier than the parental strain. The cprB gene thus behaved as a negative regulator on actinorhodin production and sporulation. Consistent with this, extra copies of cprB in the parental strain caused reduced production of actinorhodin and delay in sporulation. It is thus concluded that both cprA and cprB play regulatory roles in both secondary metabolism and morphogenesis in S. coelicolor A3(2), just as the arpA/A-factor system in Streptomyces griseus.

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