Growth and water use of the mangroves Rhizophora apiculata and R. stylosa in response to salinity and humidity under ambient and elevated concentrations of atmospheric CO2

Authors

  • M. C. BALL,

    Corresponding author
    1. Ecosystem Dynamics Group, Research School of Biological Sciences, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200, Australia
      Dr. M. C. Ball. Fax: 61 6 249 5095; e-mail: mball@rsbs-central.anu.edu.au
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  • M. J. COCHRANE,

    1. Ecosystem Dynamics Group, Research School of Biological Sciences, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200, Australia
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  • H. M. RAWSON

    1. Division of Plant Industry, CSIRO, GPO Box 1600, Canberra, ACT 2601, Australia
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Dr. M. C. Ball. Fax: 61 6 249 5095; e-mail: mball@rsbs-central.anu.edu.au

ABSTRACT

Two mangrove species, Rhizophora apiculata and R. stylosa, were grown for 14 weeks in a multifactorial combination of salinity (125 and 350 mol m−3 NaCl), humidity (43 and 86% relative humidity at 30°C) and atmospheric CO2 concentration (340 and 700 cm3 m−3). Under ambient [CO2], growth responses to different combinations of salinity and humidity were consistent with interspecific differences in distribution along natural gradients of salinity and aridity in northern Australia. Elevated [CO2] had little effect on relative growth rate when it was limited by salinity but stimulated growth when limited by humidity. Both species benefited most from elevated [CO2] under relatively low salinity conditions in which growth was vigorous, but relative growth rate was enhanced more in the less salt-tolerant and more rapidly growing species, R. apiculata. Changes in both net assimilation rate and leaf area ratio contributed to changes in relative growth rates under elevated [CO2], with leaf area ratio increasing with decrease in humidity. Increase in water use efficiency under elevated [CO2] occurred with increase, decrease or no change in evaporation rates; water use characteristics which depended on both the species and the growth conditions. In summary, elevated [CO2] is unlikely to increase salt tolerance, but could alter competitive rankings of species along salinity × aridity gradients.

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