Successful ventilatory management of post-anesthetic airway collapse and hypoxemia in a dog

Authors

  • Janet Aldrich DVM,

    1. From the Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital (Janet Aldrich, Kate Hopper), Department of Medicine and Epidemiology (Lynelle Johnson) and Department of Surgical and Radiologic Sciences (Steve Haskins), School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California, Davis, Davis, CA.
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  • Kate Hopper DVM,

    1. From the Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital (Janet Aldrich, Kate Hopper), Department of Medicine and Epidemiology (Lynelle Johnson) and Department of Surgical and Radiologic Sciences (Steve Haskins), School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California, Davis, Davis, CA.
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  • Lynelle Johnson DVM, MS, PhD, DACVIM,

    1. From the Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital (Janet Aldrich, Kate Hopper), Department of Medicine and Epidemiology (Lynelle Johnson) and Department of Surgical and Radiologic Sciences (Steve Haskins), School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California, Davis, Davis, CA.
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  • Steve Haskins DVM, MS, DACVA, DACVECC

    1. From the Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital (Janet Aldrich, Kate Hopper), Department of Medicine and Epidemiology (Lynelle Johnson) and Department of Surgical and Radiologic Sciences (Steve Haskins), School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California, Davis, Davis, CA.
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Dr Janet Aldrich, Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California, Davis, One Shields Avenue, Davis, CA 95616, E-mail: jaldrich@ucdavis.edu

Abstract

Abstract Objective: To report a life-threatening complication (airway collapse) associated with a common procedure (anesthesia) and to describe its successful management.

Case Summary: A dog without pre-existing signs of respiratory disease developed hypoxemia and severe atelectasis in the post-anesthetic recovery period and was demonstrated, by bronchoscopic examination, to have severe airway collapse. Mechanical ventilation was used to re-expand collapsed lung units and to prevent re-collapse. A ventilation strategy designed to minimize airway and alveolar trauma was used. The dog was successfully weaned from the ventilator and made a full recovery.

Unique Information Provided: Acute, severe hypoxemia due to airway collapse occurred in the post-operative period in a dog with no signs of pre-existing respiratory disease. The dog was successfully managed with short-term mechanical ventilation. High frequency jet ventilation was used for a diagnostic bronchoscopy.

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