Acute staphylococcal peritonitis following cystocentesis in a dog

Authors

  • Andrew Specht,

    1. From the Department of Clinical Sciences, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (Andrew Specht), Department of Small Animal Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602 (Marc Kent), Department of Surgery, Animal Medical Center, 510 E. 62nd St., NY 10021 (John Benson) and Department of Clinical Sciences, Tufts University School of Veterinary Medicine, North Grafton, MA 01536 (Therese O'Toole, Elizabeth Rozanski, John Rush).
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  • Daniel Chan,

    1. From the Department of Clinical Sciences, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (Andrew Specht), Department of Small Animal Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602 (Marc Kent), Department of Surgery, Animal Medical Center, 510 E. 62nd St., NY 10021 (John Benson) and Department of Clinical Sciences, Tufts University School of Veterinary Medicine, North Grafton, MA 01536 (Therese O'Toole, Elizabeth Rozanski, John Rush).
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  • Therese O'Toole,

    1. From the Department of Clinical Sciences, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (Andrew Specht), Department of Small Animal Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602 (Marc Kent), Department of Surgery, Animal Medical Center, 510 E. 62nd St., NY 10021 (John Benson) and Department of Clinical Sciences, Tufts University School of Veterinary Medicine, North Grafton, MA 01536 (Therese O'Toole, Elizabeth Rozanski, John Rush).
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  • Marc Kent,

    1. From the Department of Clinical Sciences, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (Andrew Specht), Department of Small Animal Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602 (Marc Kent), Department of Surgery, Animal Medical Center, 510 E. 62nd St., NY 10021 (John Benson) and Department of Clinical Sciences, Tufts University School of Veterinary Medicine, North Grafton, MA 01536 (Therese O'Toole, Elizabeth Rozanski, John Rush).
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  • John Benson,

    1. From the Department of Clinical Sciences, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (Andrew Specht), Department of Small Animal Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602 (Marc Kent), Department of Surgery, Animal Medical Center, 510 E. 62nd St., NY 10021 (John Benson) and Department of Clinical Sciences, Tufts University School of Veterinary Medicine, North Grafton, MA 01536 (Therese O'Toole, Elizabeth Rozanski, John Rush).
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  • Elizabeth A. Rozanski,

    1. From the Department of Clinical Sciences, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (Andrew Specht), Department of Small Animal Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602 (Marc Kent), Department of Surgery, Animal Medical Center, 510 E. 62nd St., NY 10021 (John Benson) and Department of Clinical Sciences, Tufts University School of Veterinary Medicine, North Grafton, MA 01536 (Therese O'Toole, Elizabeth Rozanski, John Rush).
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  • John E. Rush

    1. From the Department of Clinical Sciences, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (Andrew Specht), Department of Small Animal Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602 (Marc Kent), Department of Surgery, Animal Medical Center, 510 E. 62nd St., NY 10021 (John Benson) and Department of Clinical Sciences, Tufts University School of Veterinary Medicine, North Grafton, MA 01536 (Therese O'Toole, Elizabeth Rozanski, John Rush).
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Dr Elizabeth Rozanski, Department of Clinical Sciences, Tufts University School of Veterinary Medicine, 200 Westboro Road, North Grafton, MA 01536, USA. E-mail: elizabeth.rozanski@tufts.edu

Abstract

Objective: Description of a case of acute gram-positive peritonitis following cystocentesis and leakage of contaminated urine into the peritoneal cavity.

Case summary: A 6-year-old male Standard Poodle was presented for stranguria and was identified to have a urethral obstruction. Attempts at retrograde urethral catheterization failed and a decompressive cystocentesis was performed. Within several hours, the dog became dull, tachycardic, tachypneic, pyrexic and profoundly hypovolemic. Septic peritonitis resulting from the introduction of a staphylococcal organism from a urinary tract infection into the peritoneal cavity was identified. The dog responded well to surgical therapy and medical management.

New or unique information provided: To the authors' knowledge, this is the first detailed report of gram-positive septic peritonitis resulting from a therapeutic cystocentesis. This is contrary to most other reports of septic peritonitis in dogs, where the causative agent is a gram-negative organism. The characteristics of sepsis caused by a gram-positive organism are different and in humans the relative importance of gram-positive sepsis is increasing.

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