Genotypical Variability for the Tasks of Water Collecting and Scenting in a Honey Bee Colony

Authors

  • Per Kryger,

    1. Department of Zoology & Entomology, University of Pretoria, Pretoria, and Institut für Zoologie-Molekulare Ökologie, Martin-Luther-Universität, Halle/Wittenberg
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  • Ute Kryger,

    1. Department of Zoology & Entomology, University of Pretoria, Pretoria, and Institut für Zoologie-Molekulare Ökologie, Martin-Luther-Universität, Halle/Wittenberg
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  • Robin F. A. Moritz

    1. Department of Zoology & Entomology, University of Pretoria, Pretoria, and Institut für Zoologie-Molekulare Ökologie, Martin-Luther-Universität, Halle/Wittenberg
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Corresponding author: Per Kryger, Department of Zoology and Entomology,University of Pretoria, Pretoria 0002, South Africa. E-mail: pkryger@zoology.up.ac.za

Abstract

The polyandrous mating behaviour of the honey bee queen increases the genotypical variability amongst her worker offspring. Microsatellite DNA analyses revealed a total of 16 subfamilies in one colony of honey bees. The subfamilies were represented in significantly different proportions in two subgroups of bees, water collecting bees and scenting bees, indicating a genetic component in task choice.

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