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Effects Of Resistance Training On Bone Parameters In Young And Mature Rats

Authors

  • Kim Bennell,

    1. *School of Physiotherapy, Department of Physiology, §School of Dental Science, The University of Melbourne and The University of Melbourne Department of Medicine and Bone and Mineral Service, The Royal Melbourne Hospital, Parkville, Victoria, Australia
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  • Carolyn Page,

    1. *School of Physiotherapy, Department of Physiology, §School of Dental Science, The University of Melbourne and The University of Melbourne Department of Medicine and Bone and Mineral Service, The Royal Melbourne Hospital, Parkville, Victoria, Australia
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  • Karim Khan,

    1. *School of Physiotherapy, Department of Physiology, §School of Dental Science, The University of Melbourne and The University of Melbourne Department of Medicine and Bone and Mineral Service, The Royal Melbourne Hospital, Parkville, Victoria, Australia
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    • ¶Present address: The School of Human Kinetics, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada.

  • Stuart Warmington,

    1. *School of Physiotherapy, Department of Physiology, §School of Dental Science, The University of Melbourne and The University of Melbourne Department of Medicine and Bone and Mineral Service, The Royal Melbourne Hospital, Parkville, Victoria, Australia
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    • #Present address: Department of Physiology, University of Dublin, Trinity College, Dublin 2, Ireland.

  • # David Plant,

    1. *School of Physiotherapy, Department of Physiology, §School of Dental Science, The University of Melbourne and The University of Melbourne Department of Medicine and Bone and Mineral Service, The Royal Melbourne Hospital, Parkville, Victoria, Australia
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  • David Thomas,

    1. *School of Physiotherapy, Department of Physiology, §School of Dental Science, The University of Melbourne and The University of Melbourne Department of Medicine and Bone and Mineral Service, The Royal Melbourne Hospital, Parkville, Victoria, Australia
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  • Joseph Palamara,

    1. *School of Physiotherapy, Department of Physiology, §School of Dental Science, The University of Melbourne and The University of Melbourne Department of Medicine and Bone and Mineral Service, The Royal Melbourne Hospital, Parkville, Victoria, Australia
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  • David Williams,

    1. *School of Physiotherapy, Department of Physiology, §School of Dental Science, The University of Melbourne and The University of Melbourne Department of Medicine and Bone and Mineral Service, The Royal Melbourne Hospital, Parkville, Victoria, Australia
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  • John D Wark

    1. *School of Physiotherapy, Department of Physiology, §School of Dental Science, The University of Melbourne and The University of Melbourne Department of Medicine and Bone and Mineral Service, The Royal Melbourne Hospital, Parkville, Victoria, Australia
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Correspondence: Dr Kim Bennell School of Physiotherapy, University of Melbourne, 200 Berkeley Street, Carlton, Victoria 3052, Australia. Email: k.bennell@physio.unimelb.edu.au

SUMMARY

1. Osteoporosis is a major public health problem that is predicted to worsen over the next decade and preventative strategies that increase bone strength have become the focus of substantial research.

2. Although mechanical load is a primary factor in the acquisition and maintenance of skeletal tissue, the type of exercise used and when in life it is most effectively prescribed remain inconclusive.

3. The present study compared 10 weeks of resistance training in both young and mature female Sprague-Dawley rats and measured bone density and body composition by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry and biomechanical properties by three point bending tests of the tibia and femur.

4. No significant differences were observed for any of the bone parameters when comparing exercise and control groups at either age. This was despite using a comparable training protocol to that in humans and using loads of approximately 150% bodyweight.

5. The present study concludes that more intensive work programmes of resistance training or different outcome measures are required when using animal models for skeletal research.

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