Recent Developments Concerning Diet And Hypertension

Authors

  • Lawrie J Beilin,

    1. University Department of Medicine, Royal Perth Hospital, University of Western Australia and HeartSearch WA, Perth, Western Australia, Australia
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  • Valerie Burke,

    1. University Department of Medicine, Royal Perth Hospital, University of Western Australia and HeartSearch WA, Perth, Western Australia, Australia
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  • Ian B Puddey,

    1. University Department of Medicine, Royal Perth Hospital, University of Western Australia and HeartSearch WA, Perth, Western Australia, Australia
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  • Trevor A Mori,

    1. University Department of Medicine, Royal Perth Hospital, University of Western Australia and HeartSearch WA, Perth, Western Australia, Australia
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  • Jonathan M Hodgson

    1. University Department of Medicine, Royal Perth Hospital, University of Western Australia and HeartSearch WA, Perth, Western Australia, Australia
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  • Presented at the IIIrd Franco–Australian Meeting on Hypertension, Corsica, France, June 2001. The papers in these proceedings have been peer reviewed.

Professor LJ Beilin, University Department of Medicine, GPO Box X 2213, Perth, WA 6847, Australia. Email: lbeilin@cyllene.uwa.edu.au

SUMMARY

1. Recent data from randomized controlled dietary trials have shown blood pressure-lowering effects of foodstuffs and dietary patterns to be of practical importance for both individual and population blood pressure control.

2. The salient studies include Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) trials, on complex dietary patterns and of additive effects of salt restriction, Trial of Nonpharmacologic Interventions in the Elderly (TONE), on weight control and sodium restriction as substitutes for drug therapy, and two Australian trials showing additive effects of dietary fish and weight control and of dietary protein and fibre in treated hypertensives.

3. Regular coffee drinking raised blood pressure in older hypertensives, whereas potential antihypertensive effects of dietary anti-oxidants require further scrutiny.

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