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Parents’ perspectives of health-care delivery to their chronically ill children during school

Authors

  • Elizabeth Notaras BA DipEd RN,

    1. Paediatric Gastroenterology Clinical Nurse Consultant, John Hunter Children's Hospital, Newcastle, New South Wales, Australia
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  • Diana Keatinge RN RSCN MAdmin PhD,

    1. Professor of Paediatric, Youth and Family Nursing, University of Newcastle and Hunter Area Health Service, Newcastle, New South Wales, Australia
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  • James Smith RN CertPeds BHSc,

    1. Paediatric Neurology Clinical Nurse Consultant, John Hunter Children's Hospital, Newcastle, New South Wales, Australia
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  • Judith Cordwell RN Mid ICC CCU,

    1. Paediatric Respiratory Clinical Nurse Consultant, John Hunter Children's Hospital, Newcastle, New South Wales, Australia
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  • Dianne Cotterell RN BHSc(Nurs) Onc(Cert),

    1. Paediatric Oncology Clinical Nurse Consultant, John Hunter Children's Hospital, Newcastle, New South Wales, Australia
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  • Elizabeth Nunn RN BHSc DipEpi/Health

    Corresponding author
    1. Paediatric Endocrinology Clinical Nurse Consultant, John Hunter Children's Hospital, Newcastle, New South Wales, Australia
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Ms Elizabeth Notaras, 7 Chateau Place, Eleebana, NSW 2282, Australia. Email: elizabeth.notaras@hunter.health.nsw.gov.au

Abstract

This study sought to identify parents’ perspectives about issues relating to the provision of health care to their chronically ill children while they are at school. A survey of parents with school-aged children attending the paediatric subspecialty outpatients clinic in a large teaching hospital was designed to collect both qualitative and quantitative data about this topic. Findings included that 48% (n =161) of parents participating in the study said their child required some form of care or attention while at school. Highest scoring areas of need included supervision of meals (36%), administering insulin (19%), and administering nebulizers/puffers (19%). In addition, 75% of parents with children requiring health care while in school said that special knowledge and skill was required to deliver this care; 56% of these parents did not feel that teachers had the knowledge that would enable them too look after their chronically ill child during school hours.

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